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Bobby Minor

NHCLC’s Education Sunday To Be Celebrated in All 50 States on Sept. 3

Thousands of Congregations Unite in Support of High-Quality Education for All American Students

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – For the first time ever, National Education Sunday – an initiative of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference’s Faith and Education Coalition – will be celebrated across all 50 states. From Alaska to Alabama, congregations, especially those representing minorities and other low-income and marginalized communities, will unite in support of a common goal: quality education for all students regardless of ZIP code, ethnicity or income.

National Education Sunday will be held on Sept. 3, 2017, and invites congregations from multiple denominations and ethnic backgrounds to commit to advocating for, and working on behalf of education excellence in their communities.

Dr. Andrea Ramirez, Executive Director of the Faith and Education Coalition – NHCLC, adds, “Churches are central to much of American life, but this is perhaps especially true when it comes to Hispanic, African-American and immigrant communities. As such, church gatherings are a natural place for parents and community leaders to discuss education. So often, these communities have been left out of the discussion or unsure of how to even begin to get involved. Education Sunday is an effective means by which more people at a grassroots level can engage this critically important conversation.

Dr. Ramirez notes that Education Sunday is an ideal time to invite a principal, teacher, or district leader to share ways the church can best serve and support local students and schools. “This is a great opportunity to invite all local stakeholders to the table. Our prayer is that education equity can become a reality for all children across our country. The era of families moving solely to gain access to ‘the good schools’ needs to end, and churches can be a part of the solution.

Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, president of NHCLC/CONEL and a former public-school educator adds, “A lot of people are unaware that, according to multiple polls, education is consistently the No. 1 or No. 2 most important issue to Hispanics. This is largely because we know that education is – or at least should be – our society’s great equalizer. Education Sunday is about helping local communities ensure that remains true for the next generation.”

The NHCLC hosts a resource page at www.FaithandEducation.com for churches participating in Education Sunday. Bilingual tools, resources and other information for parents and church leaders include:

  • Education Sunday Tools for Churches: resources include a sample sermon, Bible studies for a variety of age groups, bilingual “Back to School” tips from Scholastic, bilingual information from the College Board and more.

 

  • More through the year: resources are provided year-round, including a monthly education e-newsletter and an electronic bilingual College. Church leaders will learn how they can participate in state-based conversations such as school accountability and guaranteeing English language learners have access to information for student success.

 

  • Parent Toolkit: parents can plan for a successful school year with tips for student success, parent-teacher conference guides, suggestions for test prep, and links to academic standards by grade level.

Dr. Antipas Harris, a member of the NHCLC Board and a leader in the Faith and Education Coalition, encourages African-American churches to join Education Sunday: “From both practical and moral perspectives, education is a key mechanism in pursuit of equality in society. Education sharpens students’ critical thinking and prepares them for an outstanding future. Education Sunday shows that the Church advocates for children to rise to fulfill their God-given potential. That is as true of the African-American community as it is for Hispanics, whites and Asians. All groups and communities should be involved in ensuring education equity for our children.

The National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference (NHCLC/CONEL), the nation’s leading organization for 16 million Hispanic-American Evangelicals, founded Education Sunday in 2005. The NHCLC holds Education as one of its core directives, advocating for education equity and high academic standards for all students.

When we come together on behalf of our children and our students, we act as an influencing agent within our culture and an agent of change within our communities. Join us on Sept. 3 as we support excellent education options for every child in America,” adds Rev. Rodriguez.

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Faith and Education Coalition is an initiative of the National Hispanic Christian Leaders Conference (NHCLC). With 2,568 members representing almost 3,000 local churches in 44 states, the Faith and Education Coalition advocates for high-quality education options for all of America’s children.

 

Website | www.faithandeducation.com

 

NHCLC/CONEL is the world’s largest Hispanic Christian organization. It serves as a representative voice for the more than 100 million Hispanic Evangelicals assembled in over 40,000 U.S. churches and another 500,000 congregations spread throughout the Spanish-speaking diaspora.

 

Website | www.nhclc.org                    Twitter | @nhclc

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Rev. Samuel Rodriguez Speaks Out on the Arrest of Immigrant Pastor.

Please click here to sign the Petition to keep Pastor Noe Carias from being deported.

Yesterday, we posted a story about a California pastor named Noe Carias, who was arrested by immigration officials because they said he was “deportable.” Carries has been in the U.S. for more than 20 years, is married to an American citizen and has two young children.

His arrest sparked outrage in the local community. Now, Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, a pastor and president of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference, is speaking out.

In an interview with The Christian Post, “By all accounts, Pastor Carias is a law-abiding and productive member of his Los Angeles community. Beyond that, he is a model father of two children who are both U.S. citizens and Wednesday will be his 14th wedding anniversary to his wife Victoria.”

He also directly called out President Trump: “Time and again, President Trump has stated his priority would be to deport violent criminals, drug dealers, human traffickers and gang members. Pastor Carias is the very opposite of that description. We should deport pushers, not pastors.”

Rodriguez actually spoke at Trump’s inauguration and has occasionally worked as an informal White House advisor. He told TCP, “We have worked tirelessly with the White House and the Trump administration precisely in order to avoid this kind of result.”

You can read his full statement here.

(This post originally appeared here: https://relevantmagazine.com/slice/rev-samuel-rodriguez-speaks-out-on-the-arrest-of-immigrant-pastor/ )

 

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[Press Release] Rev. Tony Suarez and Dr. Gus Reyes to Head Newly Opened D.C. Office for the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference

Washington—In a time when the Hispanic community is growing not only in size but also in influence and electoral importance in the United States, the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference (NHCLC) is expanding its operations in Washington, D.C. The organization will do so by appointing long-term NHCLC executives, Dr. Gus Reyes, Executive Committee and SVP Rev. Tony Suarez to lead the group’s activities on Capitol Hill.

I am grateful for the trust and confidence the NHCLC leadership and President Rev. Samuel Rodriguez has placed in me,” says Dr. Gus Reyes. “I am eager to get started, hitting the pavement and working with representatives from both parties. Hispanics represent an increasingly important swing vote that aligns with aspects of both major parties. As such, we have an opportunity to be a bridge between conservatives and progressives on many issues that have perplexed and frustrated our legislative process for decades.”

What an honor it is to serve the NHCLC in this capacity,” say Rev. Suarez on the new appointment, “I anticipate hitting the ground running with greater intensity than ever before. As both a Hispanic-American and as a Christian, it is incumbent upon our community to invest our energies and our resources in the hard work of advocating on behalf of immigration reform, religious freedom, criminal justice reform and education equality. To quote my mentor, Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, ‘Silence is not an option.’

The NHCLC has long enjoyed a productive working relationship with Democrats and Republicans on the Hill, one that transcends the partisan gridlock so often associated with Washington. The NHCLC and their political partners are united by their concern for the well-being of America’s Hispanic and other minority and immigrant communities.

NHCLC President Rev. Samuel Rodriguez says, “I am confident that both Rev. Suarez and Dr. Reyes will continue to be a tireless champions for Hispanics and minority communities as well as the broader faith community. Their expanded roles suit each of them perfectly as a natural extension of so much of what they are already engaged in. At our D.C. office, the NHCLC and the communities we represent, will be in good hands. The NHCLC does not follow the donkey or the elephant, but, insists on following the Lamb’s agenda.”

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Rev. Tony Suárez is an author, speaker, and pastor, and serves as the executive vice president of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference. Newsmax has named Suarez as one of the 50 most influential Republican Latinos in the United States. Rev. Suárez is a sought-after media resource (featured on CNN, MSNBC, Telemundo, Univision, Mundo Fox and NBC Latino, to name a few) and also serves on various committees including the Faith Advisory Board for the White House. 

Dr. Gus Reyes serves on the Executive Committee of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference as well as the Director of the Christian Life Commission for Texas Baptists. Previously, Dr. Reyes served as the Director of Hispanic Education Initiative/Affinity Ministries for Texas Baptists and is the co-writer with Dr. Richard Ross of “30 Days, Turning the Hearts of Parents and Teens Towards Each Other.”

NHCLC is the world’s largest Hispanic Christian organization. It serves as a representative voice for Hispanic Evangelicals assembled in over 40,000 U.S. churches.

Website | www.nhclc.org                       Twitter | @nhclc

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EP 20: Life and Leadership Today with Guests, Sammy Rodriguez and Bishop Harry Jackson

Today, we talk with two leaders who champion racial unity and healing. Sammy Rodriguez is known as one of the most influential Latino voices in America. He is the President of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference, the world’s largest Hispanic Christian organization. Bishop Harry Jackson is one of the Chief Conveners of the Reconciled Church. Both of our guests today serve on the White House Evangelical Faith Advisory Board, and are authorities on racial unity in America. Listen to the interview here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/ep-20-life-leadership-today-guests-sammy-rodriguez/id1211279930?i=1000390006888&mt=2

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Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, President of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference, Applauds Independent Peer Review of State Accountability Plans

“Not only does this review identify a set of best practices that will help states improve their plans, they have also drawn attention to a glaring hole in the state plans that have already been submitted to the U.S. Department of Education…”

—Rev. Samuel Rodriguez

 

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Rev. Dr. Samuel Rodriguez, President of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference, issues the following statement in reaction to the Collaborative for Student Success’ Check State Plans project released Tuesday, June 27, 2017:

“Today, the Collaborative for Student Success released what I believe, represents a landmark achievement in the discussion surrounding public education (K-12) accountability. While most agree districts and schools must and should serve all of its students well, these statements are seldom backed up with specific measures outlining what good accountability looks like, especially regarding educational equity for Hispanics, minorities and lower-income students.

“The Collaborative’s Check State Plans project changes that. By working hand-in-hand with Bellwether Education Partners, their peer review of state accountability plans provides states across the country with a set of comprehensive feedback from education experts that will help to move our nation closer to ensuring all of America’s students, regardless of race, income or ZIP code, have access to a high quality, public education.

“Not only does this review identify a set of best practices that will help states improve their plans, they have also drawn attention to a glaring hole in the state plans that have already been submitted to the U.S. Department of Education: none of the 17 plans that they reviewed adequately address how they will ensure a high-quality education for all students. Effective accountability clearly impacts education equality, one of the most critical social justice issues of our time, and the Check State Plans projects underscores the fact that there is more work to do. I applaud the Collaborative for Student Success for their leadership in this important area.”

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Rev. Samuel Rodriguez is president of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference. He has been named by CNN and Fox News as “the leader of the Hispanic Evangelical movement” and TIME Magazine nominated him among the 100 most influential leaders in America. 

NHCLC/CONEL is the world’s largest Hispanic Christian organization. It serves as a representative voice for the more than 100 million Hispanic Evangelicals assembled in over 40,000 U.S. churches and another 500,000 congregations spread throughout the Spanish-speaking diaspora. 

Website | www.nhclc.org Twitter | @nhclc 

 

Faith and Education Coalition is an initiative of the National Hispanic Christian Leaders Conference (NHCLC). With 2,568 members representing almost 3,000 local churches in 44 states, the Faith and Education Coalition advocates for high-quality education options for all of America’s children.

 

Website | www.faithandeducation.com

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Federal Judge Blocks Deportation of Iraqi Christians

A federal judge in Michigan has temporarily blocked the deportation of more than 100 Iraqi Christians living in Detroit, who fear for their lives if they are forced to return to their native land. The 114 Iraqi nationals were arrested June 11 by U.S. immigration officers, and were facing deportation before a lawsuit was filed on their behalf by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Michigan.

U.S. District Judge Mark Goldsmith made the ruling June 22, saying that the Iraqis could stay in the United States for two weeks while the courts sort out who has jurisdiction in the case.

The Justice Department had argued that the detainees, many who have been in the United States for decades, must plead their case for remaining in the United States before an immigration court rather than a U.S. district court. But ACLU attorneys warned that the Iraqis might be deported before an immigration judge could consider their cases.

In his ruling Goldsmith agreed, saying that the possible harm facing the Iraqi detainees “far outweighs any conceivable interest the government might have in the immediate enforcement of the removal orders before this court can clarify whether it has jurisdiction to grant relief to petitioners on the merits of their claims.”

Clarence Dass, one of the attorneys representing the Iraqis, said he was “ecstatic” with the temporary stay. “When your life is on the line, each day is a victory — and in this case, 14 days,” he said. “We now have the breathing room to ensure that every individual detained has the proper motions filed and, ultimately, a chance to be heard. The work continues.”

The Associated Press reported that the majority of the Iraqi detainees are Chaldean Christians, while a few are Shiite Muslims who have converted to Christianity. They were among more than 200 Iraqis arrested in recent weeks, with the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) claiming that all have criminal convictions in the United States.

But ACLU attorneys argued that forcing the Iraqi Christians they represent to return to their native land would place them in danger. “We are thankful and relieved that our clients will not be immediately be sent to Iraq, where they face grave danger of persecution, torture, or death,” said Michael J. Steinberg, legal director for the ACLU of Michigan. “It would be unconstitutional and unconscionable to deport these individuals without giving them an opportunity to demonstrate the harm that awaits them in Iraq.”

Iraq had earlier agreed to accept Iraqi nationals being deported from the United States. In addition to the Iraqi Christians arrested in the Detroit area, at least 85 other Iraqis have been detained by the ICE across the United States. As of April 17, a total of 1,444 Iraqi nationals were facing deportation, and eight have already have been returned to Iraq.

“The court took a life-saving action by blocking our clients from being immediately sent back to Iraq,” said Lee Gelernt of the ACLU’s Immigrants’ Rights Project. “They should have a chance to show that their lives are in jeopardy if forced to return.”

According to the AP, among those facing deportation is Louis Akrawi, “who served more than 20 years in Michigan prisons for second-degree murder. He was accused of arranging a shooting that killed an innocent bystander in 1993.” His son, Victor Akrawi, explained that his father is 69 years old, “he has two artificial knees, and he needs surgery on both eyes. Sending him back to Iraq is unfair.”

Another is 47-year-old Moayad Barash, whose 18-year-old daughter Cynthia explained that her father’s only conviction was for marijuana possession in the 1980s. “My dad is Christian and Donald Trump is sending him back to a place that is not safe whatsoever,” she said. “He did something wrong 30 years ago. He didn’t do anything today, yesterday, or a year ago.”

Christian watch-dog groups have noted that Iraq, home to about 1.5 million Christians in 2003, now has fewer than 300,000, all of whom face severe persecution and even death at the hands of Islamic radicals, many aligned with ISIS.

On June 19, a group of influential evangelical leaders sent an open letter to the Trump administration on behalf of the detained Iraqi Christians. “We write urgently and with grave concern that Christians will be removed from the United States to face potential persecution, and even death, in the Middle East,” reads the letter, addressed to Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly. The Christian leaders called on the Trump administration to “exercise the discretion available under law to defer the deportation of Chaldeans who pose no threat to U.S. public safety to Iraq until such time as the situation in Iraq stabilizes and its government proves willing and capable of protecting the rights of religious minorities.”

Added the letter: “We would urge you to take the same approach to any individual, regardless of whether they share our Christian faith or not, who does not pose a threat to the safety of Americans and for whom deportation would be likely to result in persecution, torture, or death.”

The letter is signed by seven evangelical leaders: Leith Anderson, president of the National Association of Evangelicals; Scott Arbeiter, president of World Relief; Shirley Hoogstra, president of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities; Hyepin Im, president of Korean Churches for Community Development; Jo Anne Lyon, ambassador and general superintendent emerita of the Wesleyan Church; Russell Moore, president of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention; and Samuel Rodriguez, president of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference.

Original post can be read here: https://www.thenewamerican.com/world-news/item/26333-federal-judge-blocks-deportation-of-iraqi-christians

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Russell Moore, Ravi Zacharias, 100 Christian Leaders Sign Criminal Justice Declaration

Organized by Prison Fellowship, the Colson Center for Christian Worldview, the Southern Baptist Convention’s Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission and the National Association of Evangelicals, Christian leaders gathered at the National Press Club Tuesday to sign the “Justice Declaration.”

“The United States locks up more people than any other nation. In fact, the United States represents a mere five percent of the world’s population but we house 25 percent of the world’s incarcerated population,” Prison Fellowship CEO James Ackerman said during the press conference. “Today, there are nearly 2.2 million Americans behind bars. There are 2.7 million children with a parent in prison and there are 65 million stumbled by the consequences of a criminal conviction.”

“Our country’s over reliance on incarceration fails to make us safer or restore people and communities who have been harmed,” Ackerman continued. “The Justice Declaration represents a framework grounded in biblical values to guide the church’s response to this crisis. It has already been signed by approximately 100 Christian leaders from across the country. … Today, we invite Christians of any denomination or background to add their names at JusticeDeclaration.org.”

The declaration reads:

“Because the good news of Jesus Christ calls the Church to advocate (or “be a witness”) for biblical truth and to care for the vulnerable, we, His followers, call for a justice system that is fair and redemptive for all. The Church has both the unique ability and unparalleled capacity to confront the staggering crisis of crime and incarceration in America and to respond with restorative solutions for communities, victims, and individuals responsible for crime.

Therefore, we make an urgent appeal to all who follow the Lord Jesus Christ to:

– Affirm that the God of the Bible is a just God: justice flows from God’s very character, and the works of God’s hands are faithful and just;

– Treat every human being as a person made in God’s own image, with a life worthy of respect, protection, and care; Foster just relationships between God, fellow human beings, and property, which will lead to human flourishing;

– Redouble our efforts to prevent crime by cultivating the “seedbeds of virtue,” including families, churches, neighborhoods, schools, and other sources of moral formation;

– Care for the physical and emotional wounds of survivors of crime, ensure their safety, and support their meaningful participation in the justice system;

– Take up the cause of the poor and vulnerable, ensuring fair access to education, economic opportunity, the social safety net, and, for those accused of crimes, the instruments of justice;

– Advocate for proportional punishment, including alternatives to incarceration, that protects public safety, fosters accountability and provides opportunities to make amends;

– Preach the good news of the gospel and proclaim that true freedom in Christ is available to all, including prisoners, recognizing that His atoning sacrifice covers all sin;

– Invest in the discipleship ofincarcerated men, women, and youth, protect their safety and human dignity, and minister to the needs of families and children with incarcerated loved ones;

– Celebrate redemption in our congregations and communities by welcoming back those who have paid their debt to society, and by providing opportunities for all persons to reach their God-given potential.”

Along with Ackerman, appearing at the press conference to participate in a signing ceremony were Moore, president of ERLC; Harry Jackson, presiding bishop at International Communion of Evangelical Churches and member of President Donald Trump’s evangelical advisory board; NAE President Leith Anderson; and the Rev. Gabriel Salguero, president of the National Latino Evangelical Coalition.

The leaders at the press conference called for state and federal criminal justice systems to embrace reforms that allow offenders who are in prison to get treatment or help for underlying addictions or problems that if not addressed, could lead them back to prison after being released. The leaders called for more restorative efforts that will allow inmates to overcome their issues and be successful once they are released back into the public. The speakers also called on churches to minister and take interest in prisoners from their community and their families that are suffering.

“Our criminal justice system exists in order to restrain evil and in order to facilitate and reform those who have committed crimes,” Moore said at the press conference. “If we have a criminal justice system that doesn’t stop crime but, in many cases, actually furthers crime and makes criminals out of those who are not yet criminals and ignores those who been victims of crime and [doesn’t deal] with issues of addiction, then we have a criminal justice system that doesn’t work and ought to be fixed.”

“When we have family members left behind waiting for those who are incarcerated and wondering if anyone remembers them, the Church of Jesus Christ needs to be at the forefront of that,” Moore added. “Most of us in American life can agree, our criminal justice system doesn’t work the way it is supposed to. We should fix it and, as evangelical Christians, we should be the first to say so.”

The declaration comes amid bipartisan opposition to a memorandum signed by Attorney Gen. Jeff Sessions last month that effectively rescinded an Obama-era policy. The policy had instructed federal prosecutors to avoid charging nonviolent offenders with crimes that have unfair mandatory minimum sentences attached. The Sessions memo, however, instructs prosecutors to pursue the most serious and readily provable offenses, which opponents say could lead to “counterproductive” sentencing under current law.

Considering the declaration comes just days after Sessions defended his sentencing memo in an op-ed published by The Washington Post, the speakers at the press conference were asked to give their thoughts on mandatory minimum sentences and the May sentencing memo issued by Sessions.

“We do not believe in a system that has mandatory sentencing. We believe it removes from the judge the ability to do her or his job, which is to judge and consider the person in front of them — whether the person has repented for what they have done or whether they have taken steps to put themselves on the right path — and give them a sentence that is proportionate that the judge believes will … lead that person to behavior that is restorative and positive for the community,” Ackerman stated.

“So we do not support mandatory sentences and we think they are a big mistake,” he asserted, later adding that Prison Fellowship supports sentencing guidelines, just not mandatory sentences.

In addition to the declaration, Prison Fellowship commissioned a recent Barna poll that found that 87 percent of Americans agree that the primary goal of the justice system should be to foster restoration for all involved — including the victim, community and the person responsible for the crime. According to Barna, a higher percentage of Christians than other Americans “agree strongly” with that statement, while a total of 44 percent of evangelicals strongly agree.

Other notable signatories who were not at the press conference are Zacharias, founder of Ravi Zacharias International Ministries; Samuel Rodriguez, president of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference; Joni Eareckson Tada of Joni & Friends International Disability Center; humanitarian and member of Trump’s evangelical advisory board Johnnie Moore; and Daniel Akin, president of the Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary.

In addition, notable heads of Christian denominations signed the declaration, including the Episcopal Church’s Presiding Bishop Michael B. Curry; Foley Beach, the archbishop of the Anglican Church of North America; and Frank Dewane, the bishop of Venice & chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Committee on Domestic Justice & Human Development.

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Deporting Iraqi Christians called ‘death sentence’

WASHINGTON (BP) — Southern Baptist religious freedom advocate Russell Moore has joined other evangelical leaders in urging the Trump administration to stop its deportation of Christians to Iraq.

Moore, president of the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission (ERLC), and six others asked John Kelly, secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, in a letter Monday (June 19) to end the deportations until Iraq’s government can protect religious minorities. Recent reports have indicated the federal government has started the process of deporting Chaldean Christians back to their homeland, where the United States government has designated the murderous campaign of the Islamic State (also known as ISIS) as genocide.

“We write urgently and with grave concern that Christians will be removed from the United States to face potential persecution, and even death, in the Middle East,” said the leaders, who represent the seven organizations that are members of the Evangelical Immigration Table (EIT).

While the letter signers said they are encouraged by the Trump administration’s emphasis on protecting the rights of religious minorities globally, they requested the administration “exercise the discretion available under law to defer the deportation of Chaldeans who pose no threat to U.S. public safety to Iraq until such time as the situation in Iraq stabilizes and its government proves willing and capable of protecting the rights of religious minorities.”

They urged Kelly “to take the same approach to any individual, regardless of whether they share our Christian faith or not, who does not pose a threat to the safety of Americans and for whom deportation would be likely to result in persecution, torture, or death.”

The United States deported some Iraqis to their home country in April and is scheduled to deport about 1,400 more, according to Christianity Today.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officials arrested about 40 Chaldean Christians June 11 in the Detroit metro area, the Detroit Free Press reported. Chaldean Christians fear they will be targets of Islamic extremists if deported to Iraq.

Moore told Baptist Press, “This is wrong, wrong, wrong. Deporting these Iraqi Christians is nothing less than a death sentence.

“I cannot understand how our government could act so cruelly and counter-productively to some of the most vulnerable people in the world,” he said in written comments. “These deportations should be stopped immediately. We should be protecting these imperiled people, not surrendering them up for execution.”

Also signing onto the letter were: Samuel Rodriguez, president, National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference; Leith Anderson, president, National Association of Evangelicals; Scott Arbeiter, president, World Relief; Shirley Hoogstra, president, Council for Christian Colleges and Universities; Hyepin Im, president, Korean Churches for Community Development; and Jo Anne Lyon, ambassador and general superintendent emerita, The Wesleyan Church. EIT is a coalition of evangelical organizations supporting immigration reform.

The EIT letter cites comments by Vice President Mike Pence in making its appeal to the administration. According to the letter, Pence said at a global summit in May on Christian persecution, “[I]n Iraq, at the hands of extremists, we’ve actually seen monasteries demolished, priests and monks beheaded, and the two-millennia-old Christian tradition in Mosul virtually extinguished overnight.”

Iraq had not received deportees from the U.S. since 2010 but agreed earlier this year to do so to be removed from President Trump’s temporary travel ban, Christianity Today reported.

The letter signers acknowledge at least some of the Iraqis facing deportation have committed crimes.

“We do not minimize the serious criminal offenses of which some of these individuals have been convicted; it is entirely appropriate that they be punished for their offenses,” the letter says. “However, having served their sentences, we must seriously consider whether it is just to deport a person who poses little risk to the American public to a situation where they are likely to experience significant harm because of their faith.”

The U.S. House of Representatives approved legislation June 6 to aid Christians and other survivors of the genocide committed by ISIS and to bring the perpetrators to justice. The bill, which still requires Senate approval before going to Trump, would provide humanitarian aid to Christians, Yazidis, Shia Muslims and other religious and ethnic minorities in the two Middle East countries. It also would promote criminal investigations and prosecutions of the terrorists responsible for genocidal acts and crimes against humanity.

In March 2016, then-Secretary of State John Kerry designated the terrorist campaign by ISIS against Christians and other religious minorities as genocide. No ISIS member has been tried for genocide, crimes against humanity or war crimes since then, religious freedom advocates have said.

ISIS’ terror campaign in the Middle East has included execution, rape and sexual enslavement. Other ISIS atrocities cited by religious liberty advocates include torture, mass graves, assassination of religious leaders and the destruction of churches, monasteries and cemeteries.

Violence by Islamic extremists since the invasion of Iraq in 2003 has resulted in an exodus from the country by many Christians and other religious adherents. The number of professing Christians in that country has declined by death and displacement from as much as 1.4 million to less than 300,000, according to estimates.

Original post can be read here: http://bpnews.net/49087/deporting-iraqi-christians-called-death-sentence

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Latino Christians Lead Tidal Wave of Change in Church, Communities, the World

“For many, the Latino Reformation is unknown, unrecognized, and unimportant—three good reasons why every white and black Christian needs to read When Faith Catches Fire.” —Dr. Scot McKnight, Julius R. Mantey professor of New Testament, Northern Seminary

Latino Christians are blazing trails of local, national, regional and global change. In the next few years, their influence will only continue to grow and be felt in the church, in business, in government and politics, in the economy, in arts and sports and in the important and pressing issue of race relations.

This year the Christian church will celebrate the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation. In When Faith Catches Fire: Embracing the Spiritual Passion of the Latino Reformation (WaterBrook, June 20, 2017), Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, president of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference, and Dr. Robert Crosby, theology professor at Southeastern University, argue that the Latino Reformation has begun. A movement they call the “salsafication” of the church is poised to impact every area of culture.

According to Rodriguez and Crosby, the tipping point is here. Consider these facts:

  • •Latino Evangelicals are the fastest-growing religious group in the United States…
  • •Latinos are turning not just to Protestantism but to its evangelical strain…more than 35% of Hispanics in America call themselves born-again…
  • The massive Christian population in Latin America is becoming more Pentecostal or charismatic Rodriguez was the first Evangelical Latino to participate in the inauguration ceremony for a U.S. president…

“We believe the church’s greatest opportunities are now multiethnic and multigenerational…” write Rodriguez and Crosby. “Whether you’re a neighbor, pastor, teacher, government leader or businessperson who wants to reach out to Latinos, this is the book to help you do so, to help you understand more of the significance and immediacy of the opportunity.”

In When Faith Catches Fire, Rodriguez and Crosby unpack the reasons for the growing Latino influence on the Church, noting the phenomenon is more of a spiritual awakening than a social trend. This awakening is leading to what the authors see as a more passionate, spirit-filled faith sweeping throughout North and South America. Along with it comes changes in forms of worship, an emphasis on diversity and a growing concern to incorporate compassion into evangelism.

In addition, Rodriguez and Crosby address head on the Latino influence on many of the leading issues of the day for not only Latino Christians themselves, but for the direction of American society as a whole, such as:

  • Immigration
  • •Race Relations
  • •Politics
  • Sanctity of life

“This carefully researched, balanced, and highly readable book provides a superb overview of one of the most important developments in the religion and culture of our time,” says Dr. Harvey Cox, Hollis professor of divinity emeritus, Harvard University. “The volume will be indispensable for leaders and laity alike in all denominations.”

Order your copy today at http://whenfaithcatchesfirebook.com/

ABOUT THE AUTHORS:

Samuel Rodriguez is the president of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference (NHCLC)/CONEL, the world’s largest Hispanic Christian organization, which represents more than 100 million Hispanic Evangelicals in nearly 500,000 churches in the U.S. and other countries. Rodriguez, who spoke at the inauguration ceremony for President Donald Trump, is the first Evangelical Latino to participate in a presidential inauguration. He has served as an advisor to three presidents. Rodriguez is named on many lists of influencers in America’s religious and Latino communities. He is the author of The Lamb’s Agenda and Be Light. He and his family live in Sacramento, CA. www.nhclc.org.

Dr. Robert Crosby is a pastor, conference speaker and the co-founder of Teaming Life. He serves as professor of practical theology at Southeastern University in Lakeland, Florida. He has pastored multi-ethnic churches in New York, Boston, and Tampa. His most recent books include The One Jesus Loves, The Will of a Man & The Way of a Woman and The Teaming Church. He writes for Christianity Today, Leadership Journal, Outreach Magazine and The Huffington Post. www.teaminglife.com

PRAISE FOR WHEN FAITH CATCHES FIRE:

“In When Faith Catches Fire, Samuel and Robert bring us up close to this incredible growing movement of Latino Christians. Read it, and you will find your own faith enriched and reignited.” —Roma Downey, producer, actress, and president and chief content officer of Lightworkers

 

“When Faith Catches Fire is the prophetic and unapologetic response to the passionate wave of change that is on the cusp of exploding from the church to the corridors of Washington. Rodriguez and Crosby have unearthed the undeniable sound of the forthcoming Latino era. It’s the dawn of a new day, and Latinos are leading the way.” —Sergio De La Mora, founding lead pastor of Cornerstone Church in San Diego and author of The Heart Revolution

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When Faith Catches Fire

As the fastest growing minority in America, Latinos are impacting church culture through vibrant worship, fervent prayer, and a commitment to change the world–one soul at a time. Sammy Rodriguez, a national leader of the evangelical Latino church in America, will issue an invitation to Christians everywhere, to rekindle a passionate faith.

Listen to this interview with Rev. Rodriguez from Moody Radio

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