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NHCLC News

Hispanic evangelicals emerging as new source of Israel support

WASHINGTON – When Hispanic-American pastors from around the country met in the nation’s capital last week, the main issue on their agenda was not immigration or health care–it was Israel.

The pastors represented evangelical congregations from Connecticut to Oklahoma. This rapidly-growing portion of the U.S. Latino electorate could have a significant impact on American policy toward Israel in the years ahead.

The mobilization in Washington was the work of the Hispanic Israel Leadership Coalition (HILC), an arm of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference, which represents 40,118 Hispanic evangelical congregations across the country.

HILC president Pastor Mario Bramnick told JNS.org the purpose of the all-day gathering was to “pray together, to consult with our Israeli and Jewish friends, and to strategize practical ways to help the Jewish state.”

Building bridges

 

Pastor Mario Bramnick, head of the Hispanic Israel Leadership Coalition. Credit: Pictigar.com.

An estimated 160 pastors took part in a morning session Oct. 5 at the Israeli Embassy, where they met privately with Israel’s Ambassador to the United States Ron Dermer. Bramnick, the spiritual leader of the New Wine Ministries Church in Cooper City, Florida, said they discussed “ways to engage the Hispanic-American community and build bridges between Hispanic Americans and Israel.” He said, “[Israeli] Prime Minister [Benjamin] Netanyahu and Amb. Dermer clearly understand the importance of reaching out to Hispanics.”

In the afternoon, several dozen of the pastors and other Hispanic evangelical activists held strategy sessions at a hotel in suburban Silver Spring, Maryland.

Among the speakers was Pastor Ruben Mendez, of the Cornerstone Church in San Antonio, Texas. He focused his remarks on the importance of encouraging pastors to become educated about Israel by visiting “and witnessing for themselves the great miracles that God has wrought, just as the Bible promised.”

Bramnick then discussed the HILC’s recent political action initiatives, saying that Christians have a moral obligation to serve as “Daniels, Josephs, and Esthers,” by speaking out for Israel. He cited the HILC’s opposition to the Iran nuclear deal, its successful lobbying to strengthen the Israel plank of the Republican Party’s platform, and its campaigns against Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions (BDS) efforts in Florida and California.

Bramnick told JNS.org he and his followers “strongly condemn” the recent resolutions adopted by mainline Protestant denominations, such as the Lutherans and the Presbyterians, calling for divestment from Israel and a cutoff of U.S. aid to Israel.

Bramnick sees a connection between those denominations’ liberal positions on social issues and their turn against Israel. “Just as they have strayed from what the Bible says about family and social matters, so too are they disregarding what God says about the Land of Israel belonging to the Jewish people,” Bramnick said. “Once you reject God’s word on some issues, it’s only a matter of time before you do the same on other issues.”

Jesse Rojo, of the Philos Project, which educates young Hispanics about the Middle East, said that “some young Latinos are confused about Israel as a result of what they hear from the media or on campus.” Nonetheless, he added, “young Hispanics are naturally predisposed to being pro-Israel, because you can’t read the Bible and not see that God wants us to support Israel.”

Several Jewish organizations are working closely with the Hispanic pro-Israel activists. Among the speakers at the strategy session were Betty Ehrenberg, executive director of the World Jewish Congress-North America; Jorge Diener, Hadassah’s director of special projects, and Sammy Eppel of B’nai B’rith-Venezuela, who co-chairs the Latin America division of the Global Forum for Combating Anti-Semitism.

Growing political power

Demographic trends suggest that Hispanic evangelicals will enjoy increasing political and social influence in the years ahead. According to Bramnick, that bodes well for Israel, “because the number of Hispanic evangelical voters is growing quickly, and for many of them, Israel is an important issue on Election Day.”

Evangelical Protestants are the largest single bloc of Christians in the United States, about 26 percent of the national population. Catholics make up 21 percent, and mainline Protestants constitute approximately 14 percent. While the evangelicals have maintained their percentage of the population in recent years, the number of mainline Protestants has been decreasing.

Among evangelicals, Hispanics are the largest ethnic minority group. About 11 percent of evangelicals are Latino and 6 percent are African-American. By comparison, among mainline Protestants, only 6 percent are Hispanic and 3 percent are black. Evangelicals as a whole are becoming more ethnically diverse: 24 percent of evangelicals were members of ethnic minorities in 2014, up from 19 percent in 2007.

Although the majority of Hispanic Americans are Catholic, their numbers have been diminishing rapidly. In 2010, 67 percent of U.S. Latinos were Catholic, but by 2013 that slid to 55 percent. By contrast, Protestants–most of them evangelicals–were just 12 percent of America’s Hispanics in 2010, but reached 22 percent by 2013, according to the Pew Research Center, which tracks and analyzes religious trends in the U.S.

Hispanic adults are an increasingly potent force in American politics. California has the largest percentage of Latinos–more than one-third of its residents–which in presidential races almost always backs the Democrat candidate. But a number of presidential battleground states also have significant Latino populations. In Arizona, they constitute 21.5 percent of eligible voters. In Nevada, 17 percent, in Florida, 18 percent and in Colorado 14.5 percent.

Original post can be read here: http://www.jns.org/latest-articles/2016/10/10/5dmqmrznb9g02oir90v1bx12axbg5o#.V_v58lQrLcs=

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‘Priceless’ Exclusive Opening Night Premiere Comes to U.S. Cinemas October 13, Featuring Special Introduction and for KING & COUNTRY Concert Performance

“God can use the church to bring an end to modern day slavery and human trafficking. It is one of the greatest issues we face and it is impacting our families and friends in the most devastating way. On October 14 a film called PRICELESS will open in theaters around the country. PRICELESS is a movie about love, rescue and redemption that will make you want to do something about these injustices! I implore all churches associated with the NHCLCand every Latin American church in the country to mark their calendar and fill up theaters around the country! Let’s see what God can do when the capital C church shows up! “

Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, President | The National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference (NHCLC)

Fathom Events, Roadside Attractions and for KING & COUNTRY Productions Offer Fans an Epic Cinema Event With Personal Introduction by Joel and Luke Smallbone and for KING & COUNTRY Performance

DENVER – October 3, 2016 – Grammy award-winning band for KING & COUNTRY bring to life a gritty story of one man’s journey back to himself and the dramatic incident that changed his life forever. “PRICELESS Premiere With for KING & COUNTRY” will show in cinemas nationwide on Thursday, October 13 at 7:30 p.m. local time, ahead of its theatrical release on October 14. Presented by Fathom Events, Roadside Attractions and for KING & COUNTRY Productions, this cinema event will include a special introduction from Joel and Luke Smallbone (front men of the popular for KING & COUNTRY), the premiere of the full-length feature and conclude with a for KING & COUNTRY performance captured live from sold-out performances at Nashville’s Bridgestone Arena and Atlanta’s Georgia Dome.

Tickets for “PRICELESS Premiere With for KING & COUNTRY” can be purchased online by visiting www.FathomEvents.com or at participating theater box offices. Fans throughout the U.S. will be able to enjoy the event in select movie theaters. For a complete list of theater locations visit the Fathom Events website (theaters and participants are subject to change).

Joel Smallbone stated, “This night really is an invitation and an expression of gratitude to our dear supporters who have rallied around the ‘Priceless’ cause for years now… everything from the exclusive chance to see the movie before anyone else, to the personal messages from Luke and me, to the exclusive concert footage from the band; this premiere is for them and a celebration of taking this great and timely message to the world!”

Inspired by true events, “Priceless” is a powerful drama/thriller about James Stevens (played by Joel Smallbone) who was, at one time, a good man with a great life. After the tragic death of his wife and losing custody of his little girl, James is angry, desperate and unable to hold down a steady job. He agrees to drive a box truck on a suspicious one-time trip cross country for cash – no questions asked. When James discovers that what he is delivering is actually two beautiful and frightened sisters unaware of the danger that awaits, he is compelled to save them.

“This event truly pulls at your heart strings and sheds light on the ongoing issue of human trafficking across the globe today,” Fathom Events Vice President of Programming Kymberli Frueh said. “We are thrilled to be able to give fans of for KING & COUNTRY the opportunity to see this new film before its nationwide release and follow it with an incredible performance from the band.”

Howard Cohen, co-president of Roadside Attractions, said, “We are thrilled to kick-off the nationwide release of ‘Priceless’ with this advance premiere, coupled with exclusive content including a for KING & COUNTRY concert. Moviegoers are in for a special night that they will remember long after they leave the theater.”
For more information about “Priceless” visit www.PricelessTheMovie.com

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Christian Leaders Publish Special Report on Faith and Economics in The Washington Times

WASHINGTON, Oct. 7, 2016 /Christian Newswire/ — Thirty-two Christian leaders from business, political, cultural, and theological sectors have come together with The Washington Times and the Institute for Faith, Work & Economics (IFWE) to publish a special report on faith and economics, entitled, “Faith at Work: Economic Flourishing, Freedom to Create and Innovate.” The report features opinion editorials from each leader and is printed inside today’s edition of The Washington Times newspaper. Click here for a downloadable copy or visit The Washington Times website. The report will be distributed to some 10,000 leaders in Washington, D.C., including every Congressional office, and has the potential to reach millions in print and online.

From Sen. Tim Scott and Gov. Sam Brownback to Dr. Albert Mohler, Jr., Dr. Larry Arnn, and Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, these leaders – including pastors and business owners – advocate for an economic system that encourages key biblical principles of creativity, stewardship, hard work, and loving your neighbor.

“We do not believe that the Bible explicitly endorses capitalism or any other economic system,” writes IFWE executive director Hugh Whelchel in the report. “Yet the Bible has much to say about economic principles, and as Christians, we should embrace its wisdom as we make economic choices in our everyday lives. It should also lead us to embrace systems that are more closely in alignment with the principles expressed in the Scriptures.”

The publication is a joint project of The Washington Times and the Institute for Faith, Work & Economics.

The Washington Times, which has stood for the values of faith, family, freedom and service since its inception in 1982, is pleased to publish a special report on the importance of the free market to economic prosperity and human flourishing,” said Larry Beasley, president and CEO of The Washington Times. “A project like this — which explores the merits of innovation, entrepreneurship, property ownership, and business models that faithfully encourage human potential — fits well with our mission to give distinctive and meaningful content to our readers.”

The Washington Times special report is divided into four sections, “Foundational Themes,” “Are Free Markets Too Costly?,” “Why Not Socialism?,” and “Markets with a Conscience.” Following are its authors: Sen. Tim Scott, Gov. Sam Brownback, Hugh Whelchel, Dr. Larry Arnn, Dr. Arthur Brooks, Daniel Garza, Michael Novak, Dr. Albert Mohler, Jr., John Stonestreet, Dr. Jonathan Pennington, Dr. Jay W. Richards, Trey Dimsdale, Dr. Anne Bradley, the late Jack Kemp, Dr. Art Lindsley, Ken Eldred, Dr. David Kotter, Dr. Joshua Greever, Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, Rev. Robert Sirico, Lawrence W. Reed, Dr. Jesse Miranda, Fred Oaks, Ismael Hernandez, Ricardo Luna, Dr. Tom Nelson, David Durell, Mike Sharrow, Terence Chatmon, John Scott, Diane Paddison, and Pastor Christopher Brooks.

The Institute for Faith, Work & Economics (IFWE) is a Christian research organization committed to advancing biblical and economic principles that help individuals find fulfillment in their work and contribute to a free and flourishing society.

Original post can be read here: http://christiannewswire.com/news/3945078545.html

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Trusting God, not government, for upward mobility

Presidential candidates, elections and even political parties come and go, but one issue has forever been, and will continue to be, at the forefront of a majority of American minds: the economy and jobs. Even as the ethnic face of America has evolved from one generation to the next, this constant has always been with us. In fact, a Gallup poll taken this year confirmed this again.

But if you’re Latino, it’s easy to get discouraged when looking around at some of our brothers and sisters toiling away at blue-collar, minimum-wage, manual labor jobs, barely scraping out a living. This is honorable and noble work, to be sure, but financial prosperity it is not.

It’s also easy to fear that prejudice, racism and bigotry could block our path to upward mobility. Our people wonder, “Is the American Dream still alive and well for us and our children?”

The answer to that question depends upon how we approach the future.

You see, Scripture tells us, “Faith is being sure of what we hope for and certain of what we do not see.” It also affirms that for those of us who believe, we are co-heirs with Christ. We were not made to be slaves, as the Israelites were in Egypt, but sons and daughters of God the Father — image bearers of God and therefore stakeholders in the world we inhabit, in America itself.

Let’s pause here for just a moment.

It’s incredibly important to remember that these are revolutionary ideas that have quite literally reshaped and reconstituted the arc of human history. In many ways, they form the basis for the modern Western world, economics, the rule of law and our understanding of democracy itself.

For Latino Americans, these ideas have the power to transform generations.

In the coming years, the sons and daughters of immigrants will see their parents’ often-meager beginnings in America alongside their irreplaceable progress afforded by their hard work, sacrifice and selflessness. They will be in awe of where they are, considering from whence they came. But they will also compare their situations to those of more affluent ethnic communities, and they will doubtless want more. You see, hard work is not enough, even though Latinos have that in spades.

And here lies the fork in the road.

Down one path is a cycle of generational poverty, the idea that we are victims of a system rigged against us. We will be tempted to believe that the government is somehow responsible for our well-being and owes us financial assistance, entitlements and subsidies.

Down the other path is financial mobility, ownership, prosperity and generational momentum. In a word, freedom. It’s the difference between merely surviving and truly thriving.

These are not republican or democratic ideas. As I said, they have always been at the forefront of the American psyche and they transcend political affiliations. After all, free enterprise and freedom are inseparable concepts. They are human and universal desires because we were made this way by God’s own design. Ask the single mother on food stamps if she would prefer instead a decent-paying job, where she could save money and get ahead. Contrary to what some would have you believe, the answer would almost always be: “I want a job.”

The same is true for those living in our ghettos and inner cities, and it is certainly the case for us Latinos.

As a Christian, I fundamentally believe that the government can’t give me something God has already promised. My identity as an image bearer of God far outweighs my circumstances, my bank account or my ethnicity.

Although God does not promise me success, wealth or fame, he does accept me. In the same way America doesn’t guarantee Latinos or anyone else prosperity but it does accept — or should accept — those who are willing to roll up their sleeves and reach for their own piece of the American dream.

It is my heart for the Latino people in this country that our faith, which is inextricably linked to our community, will be the key to unleashing all the creativity, passion and hard work we have as a people, that the next generations living in America will be blessed by the unparalleled opportunities this country can provide, that we will skip full generations in our upward mobility.

Our future will be bright indeed, if we embrace the path of free enterprise, the path of freedom — and if we deny the lie that government has do it all for us.

The Rev. Samuel Rodriguez is the lead pastor of New Season Church and president of America’s largest Hispanic Christian organization, the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference (NHCLC)/CONEL, which represents millions of evangelicals assembled in over 40,000 U.S. churches and another 500,000 congregations spread throughout the Spanish-speaking diaspora. His newest book, “Be Light: Shining God’s Beauty, Truth, and Hope Into a Darkened World,” was released this year from Waterbrook Press. Visit his website at PastorSam.com.

Original post can be read here: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2016/oct/6/trusting-god-not-government-for-upward-mobility/

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Acting on the ‘God moments’

As the plane began its descent into the Los Angeles airport, I saw thick columns of smoke billowing up from the city. That day in 1992, the Los Angeles riots opened my eyes and heart to the needs of my community. As the overseer of 50 churches in the area, I was haunted by questions about the strife that had overtaken my city: “Why is the city on fire? Where is the salt and light?”

As a pastor, my quest to better serve my community is deeply connected to my faith. In this context, the 1992 riots were a violent manifestation of the brokenness of the city. As I pondered the best way to address this need, I began to focus on the importance of Latino pastoral ministry that meaningfully speaks to the broader community.

Shortly after the riots, I transitioned from my position as a denominational officer to academia, where I spent the next two decades. While at Azusa Pacific University and Vanguard University, I taught racial-ethnic minority students, particularly those interested in theology and pastoral ministry. Although I enjoyed working with these students, I felt a nagging concern that the church was still failing to address the needs of the entire population.

Shortly after leaving Vanguard, I was interviewed by The Economist magazine for a special issue on Latinos in America (March 14, 2015). Reading the article, I was struck by the journalist’s description of my community. In his estimation, Latinos can solve the demographic issues descending on industrialized countries: “America has been granted an extraordinary stroke of luck: a big dose of youth and energy, just as its global competitors are greying.”

As I felt the magnitude of my community’s potential contribution, my conviction deepened that Hispanic pastors and churches needed to better equip people with an understanding of ministry that extends beyond the pulpit. As the Latino population rises, we will play an increasing role in the American family and our flourishing will be intimately connected to the flourishing of the broader community.

In the Latino evangelical community, we refer to experiences like the riots and the article as “God moments.”

In these moments, the Spirit directs us to act in response to a new and deeper apprehension of what it means for us to exercise God-honoring dominion in this world. In my case, these moments led me to expand churches’ capacity to promote human flourishing through whole-life discipleship, particularly surrounding work, economic freedom and development.

John L. McKnight, co-director of Northwestern University’s Asset-Based Community Development Institute, said that “communities are never built on needs and deficiencies, but rather on gifts and capabilities.” Today, the Jesse Miranda Center at Latin American Bible College is developing the gifts and capabilities of Hispanic pastors in Southern California by closing the divide between the sacred and the so-called secular, between the Sunday worship experience and the Monday workday.

We are also closing the divides between cultures (North/South) and language (English/Spanish). By closing these gaps, we can engage more deeply with the community and promote its flourishing.

In addition to creating a new curriculum and certificate program promoting the integration of faith, work and economics, we will train six cohorts of pastors in Southern California — both English-speaking and Spanish-speaking — to better minister on issues surrounding vocation and economics. In this effort, we will draw on support and resources from Made to Flourish: A Pastors’ Network for the Common Good, an organization out of Kansas City that helps pastors encourage and equip their congregants to live integrated and flourishing lives.

All Christians are called to ministry by virtue of their baptism. The connection between faith, work and economics answered my questions about the involvement of the church in every area of life for the betterment of the community. By equipping God’s people for works of service, many of which will be offered through their paid and unpaid daily work, pastors can minister to the entire community in every aspect of their lives.

We can help to heal the broken city through our diligent work. As pastors and churches celebrate the contribution workers and entrepreneurs make through their labors, whole communities will flourish. “When the righteous prosper, the city rejoices” (Proverbs 11:10).

Jesse Miranda, D.Min., is president of the Jesse Miranda Center for Hispanic Leadership, CEO emeritus of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference and executive presbyter for the General Council of the Assemblies of God. Fred Oaks is a director for the Faith, Work, & Economics Program at The Kern Family Foundation.

Original post can be read here: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2016/oct/6/acting-on-the-god-moments/

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Rev. Samuel Rodriguez: This Election Is a Matter of Life and Death

The 2016 presidential race is literally a matter of life and death.

The quintessential issue of this election is respecting the dignity and sanctity of life from the womb to the tomb.

Life is an issue with which all Americans should be concerned — white, black, brown, male, female, Republican and Democrat. The darkness of hatred, polarization, cultural decadence, religious persecution, disregard for human life and racial tension that currently abound in our nation all result from issues of life.

The womb is the first battle line from which all other matters stem — education, immigration, criminal justice reform, race relations and the list goes on. Therefore, while our value for an individual’s life must begin at conception, it only begins there.

Yes, we need national leaders who will fight for respect of all life — in every individual born and unborn. But the onus is not solely on our politicians. It is on the voter and the voice of each individual person.

It is all Americans who must stand shoulder-to-shoulder with our brother and sisters — with whom we may not agree on everything — to work together to redeem and restore life via reforms to our education and our immigration system. We must join hands with both friends and strangers of all colors to stop senseless violence toward police officers and citizens.

We must stand up and speak up — with our words, actions and our vote — for the Imago Dei, or the Image of God, to be acknowledged from birth to death. We must elect candidates who will place high regard for every individual regardless of their race, age, gender, faith or personal beliefs and who will lead our nation accordingly.

It is our duty to lift up he voices of those who have none much like portrayed in the new film, “Voiceless,” releasing Oct. 7. Our nation is at a crossroads and we must make a choice. Silence is not an option.

At the end of the day, we must merge our voices on behalf of the oppressed, the marginalized and the hurting.

Rev. Samuel Rodriguez is the author of “Be Light” and the President of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference (NHCLC), America’s largest Hispanic Christian organization, which represents millions assembled in over 40,000 U.S. Churches and another 500,000 congregations worldwide and spread throughout the Spanish-speaking diaspora.

Original post can be read here: http://www.newsmax.com/Headline/RevSamuel-Rodriguez-Election-Life-Death/2016/10/07/id/752135/

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Rev. Samuel Rodriguez Discusses Black and Blue Lives With TD Jakes

Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, president of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference (NHCLC)/CONEL, will join the “T.D. Jakes” national talk show, hosted by best-selling author, film and music producer, and entrepreneur T.D. Jakes, in its continued Conversations with America series on Sept. 29.

During the episode, Jakes will visit the scene of the crime in Charlotte, North Carolina, following the police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott. He will meet with families, officials and experts to discuss continued injustices and determine how to get beyond the black and blue and move toward justice everywhere.

Addressing the polarizing and escalating racial tension in our nation, the episode will feature a robust panel of guests discussing the ways to begin to fix and heal the country, including Rodriguez; Dr. Patrick Graham, president/CEO of the Urban League of Central Carolinas; Kerr Putney, Charlotte police chief; Dr. Tiffany Crutcher, twin sister of Terrance Crutcher in Tulsa, Oklahoma; Sharon Cooper, sister of Sandra Bland; Nakia Jones, a Ohio police officer whose video went viral; Cornell William Brooks, president of NAACP; Lisa Bloom, civil rights attorney; and Cheryl Dorsey, retired LAPD Sergeant.

“We need a multiethnic movement,” said Rodriguez. “When white, brown, black and yellow come together, we will see things happen. Today’s complacency is tomorrow’s captivity. We are what we tolerate, and silence is not an option. We can reform this but it will require all Americans to open up their eyes, repudiate myopia and say enough is enough.”

Rodriguez is president of NHCLC/CONEL, the world’s largest Hispanic Christian organization, which serves as a representative voice for the more than 100 million Hispanic evangelicals assembled in over 40,000 U.S. churches and hundreds of thousands of additional congregations spread worldwide throughout the Spanish-speaking diaspora. He is also the recipient of the 2015 Rosa Parks Courage Award, which is given annually to honor individuals who have fought for civil rights in Alabama and across the nation.

“If the global church would rise with one voice, we could effectively and successfully address the racial divide, but it requires unity and deliberation,” Rodriguez continued.

T.D. Jakes” is a newly syndicated daily one-hour talk show that premiered in more than 50 TEGNA markets on Monday, Sept. 12 as well as on OWN Sept. 19. The show and its original social media content features real personal stories and honest conversations with celebrity and non-celebrity guests. It is filmed before a live studio audience in Los Angeles and airs weekdays in afternoon time periods around the country. The series is produced by Tegna Media, 44 Blue Productions, Jakes’ TDJ Enterprises and enLight Productions.

For local listings, visit tdjakes.com.

Original post can be read here: http://www.charismanews.com/us/60246-rev-samuel-rodriguez-discusses-black-and-blue-lives-with-td-jakes

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Rev. Samuel Rodriguez Joins T.D. Jakes for Conversations with America Beyond the Black & Blue

‘T.D. Jakes’ Sept. 29 episode addresses heal our nation’s racial tensions

LOS ANGELES, Calif., Sept. 29, 2016 – Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, president of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference (NHCLC)/CONEL, will join the “T.D. Jakes” national talk show, hosted by best-selling author, film and music producer, and entrepreneur T.D. Jakes, in its continued Conversations with America series on Sept. 29.

During the episode, Jakes will visit the scene of the crime in Charlotte, North Carolina following the police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott. He will meet with families, officials and experts to discuss continued injustices and determine how to get beyond the black and blue and move toward justice everywhere.

Addressing the polarizing and escalating racial tension in our nation, the episode will feature a robust panel of guests discussing the ways to begin to fix and heal the country, including Rodriguez; Dr. Patrick Graham, president/CEO of the Urban League of Central Carolinas; Kerr Putney, Charlotte police chief; Dr. Tiffany Crutcher, twin sister of Terrance Crutcher in Tulsa, Oklahoma; Sharon Cooper, sister of Sandra Bland; Nakia Jones, a Ohio police officer whose video went viral; Cornell William Brooks, president of NAACP; Lisa Bloom, civil rights attorney; and Cheryl Dorsey, retired LAPD Sergeant.

“We need a multiethnic movement,” said Rodriguez. “When white, brown, black and yellow come together, we will see things happen. Today’s complacency is tomorrow’s captivity. We are what we tolerate, and silence is not an option. We can reform this but it will require all Americans to open up their eyes, repudiate myopia and say enough is enough.”

Rodriguez is president of NHCLC/CONEL, the world’s largest Hispanic Christian organization, which serves as a representative voice for the more than 100 million Hispanic Evangelicals assembled in over 40,000 U.S. churches and hundreds of thousands of additional congregations spread worldwide throughout the Spanish-speaking diaspora. He is also the recipient of the 2015 Rosa Parks Courage Award, which is given annually to honor individuals who have fought for civil rights in Alabama and across the nation.

“If the global Church would rise with one voice, we could effectively and successfully address the racial divide but it requires unity and deliberation,” Rodriguez continued.

“T.D. Jakes” is a newly syndicated daily one-hour talk show that premiered in more than 50 TEGNA markets on Monday, Sept. 12 as well as on OWN on Sept. 19. The show and its original social media content features real personal stories and honest conversations with celebrity and non-celebrity guests. It is filmed before a live studio audience in Los Angeles and airs weekdays in afternoon time periods around the country. The series is produced by Tegna Media, 44 Blue Productions, Jakes’ TDJ Enterprises and enLight Productions.

For local listings, visit http://www.tdjakes.com/.

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‘The Gathering’: America Can Only Be Saved by Spiritual Revival, Not a ‘Political Awakening,’ Christian Leaders Say

America won’t be saved by a “political awakening,” said Pastor Ronnie Floyd, who was among over 40 Christian leaders that came together at The Gathering to pray for a spiritual transformation in the nation.

“Many of us, as believers, at times if we’re not careful, we’re more committed to some kind of political awakening,” said Floyd at the solemn assembly hosted by Gateway Church in Southlake, Texas, Wednesday night.

“That’s not the answer to this nation. The answer to the nation is the next great awakening with the Holy Spirit of God. And He wakes up the Church and He shakes the Church,” added Floyd, who’s the senior pastor of Cross Church in Northwest Arkansas and former president of the Southern Baptist Convention.

Christian leaders from diverse denominational and racial backgrounds led thousands of believers in prayer for personal repentance, their marriages, families, communities, and for Christians who are persecuted throughout the world.

(Photo: Screencap/The Gathering)

James Robison is the founder and president of LIFE Outreach International, speaks at The Gathering held at Gateway Church in Southlake, Texas, September 21, 2016.

James Robison, founder and president of LIFE Outreach International, stressed that “there is no substitute for repentance. Not a political party, not a political candidate.”

“In election years if you’re highly visible and you have an audience and you have any influence, candidates will tend to come to you and ask for your support,”Robison said.

“I’ve made it clear, my entire ministry, I don’t endorse candidates. I endorse biblical truth and I endorse the principles in the Word of God.”

Robison spoke with concern about the current social climate of the United States, especially the U.S. Supreme Court’s role in legalizing abortion and gay marriage via judicial fiat.

“We’ve reached the point where five people can determine the future of the United States of America,” said Robison. “If the Church doesn’t come out of the pew and stand up and become the city set on the hill that cannot and must not be hidden, we will be trampled as worthless salt under the feet of men.”

Floyd’s and Robison’s calls for personal and public spiritual revival were echoed by Pastor Tony Evans of Oak Cliff Bible Fellowship in Dallas, who served as the main organizer of The Gathering.

 

(Photo: Screencap/The Gathering)

Pastor Tony Evans of Oak Cliff Bible Fellowship in Dallas speaks at The Gathering hosted by Gateway Church in Southlake, Texas, September 21, 2016.

Evans told those gathered that the Church is “an immune system” to help fight the ills of society.

“The Church is that immune system designed to keep cultural colds from becoming societal pneumonia,” Evans said. “So if you’re seeing our nation succumb to pneumonia, it’s because the immune system of the church is not up to snuff. It’s not acting as the divine repellent.”

At the close of the program, Evans went on to note that he saw The Gathering as having a three-pronged agenda for the long-term.

“This is part of a three-pronged pledge. Solemn assembly, a call to discipleship — no more secret agent Christians — and then to work together as churches without compromising truth to do good works to let the community see its better off that our churches are here,” Evans said.

“So you pray that God will birth in your heart and in ministries throughout this land a fire that if Christ be not come, we turn a nation around for God and for good.”

Christian leaders who led prayer and devotion at The Gathering include Southern Evangelical Seminary President Dr. Richard Land, Pastor Max Lucado, National Association of Evangelicals President Leith Anderson, Priscilla Shirer, Thelma Wells, the Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, Bishop Harry Jackson, and Pastor Ralph Douglas West, among others.

The Gathering’s solemn assembly focused on praying for four areas of change in Americans’ lives: personal, families, communities and the nation.

“Whenever a solemn assembly or sacred gathering has been called in Scripture, it has usually been called by those in leadership — whether that be a priest, prophet or king — and it has usually been called for leadership first,” The Gathering’s website states.

“Even in America, our historical records verify that prior to every national awakening, the spiritual leadership of the day has placed a heavy emphasis on gathering in smaller groups for fasting and prayer which then led to larger gatherings and greater change.”

 

(Photo: Screencap/The Gathering)

Rev. Samuel Rodriguez who serves as the President of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference/CONEL, leads a message at the close of The Gathering at Gateway Church in Southlake, Texas, September 21, 2016.

Original post can be read here: http://www.christianpost.com/news/the-gathering-america-can-only-be-saved-by-spiritual-revival-not-political-awakening-christian-leaders-say-169909/

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FOR ZION’S SAKE [CHARISMA MAGAZINE ARTICLE DOWNLOAD]

Click here to download a PDF of Charimsa Magazine’s article “For Zion’s Sake” which highlights a new breed of pro-Israel groups that are dlinigently fighting the spiritual battle againist propaganda and worldwide anti-Semitism.

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