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Education

Latino Evangelicals Urge Trump to Help Immigrant ‘Dreamers’

Latino Evangelicals Urge Trump to Help Immigrant ‘Dreamers’

08-31-2017 by Heather Sells

A court deadline next week is forcing President Trump to make a decision about the fate of young immigrants known as “Dreamers” – and Latino evangelicals say he should move to protect them.

Rev. Gabriel Salguero, associate senior pastor at Calvario City Church in Orlando and founder of the National Latino Evangelical Coalition, wrote in a recent op-ed: “Now is not the time to turn these children away but rather to remove the fear of deportation and family separation.”

Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, president of the National Hispanic Leadership Conference, told CBN News he fears the Dreamers will be deported if the president makes the wrong decision.

“Should these children pay for the sins of their parents? It’s anti-American and more importantly, anti-Biblical” he told CBN News.

Approximately 800,000 immigrants receive work permits under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals or DACA program. It allows them to work or go to school legally. All reside in the country illegally after arriving as children with their parents or older family members.

The president is under pressure from a group of Republican state lawmakers led by Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton. They have threatened to sue if Trump does not terminate the DACA program by Sept. 5th.

The president could order the Department of Homeland Security to halt the new DACA work permits immediately or at a future date and call on Congress to come up with a legislative solution.

He could also continue issuing the permits which would trigger the Republican court challenge and then decide whether or not to defend the program in court.

Rodriguez says the president may be able to work a deal with Congress if it can move forward with border security legislation.

“He’s not going to give 750,000 kids a proverbial break in perpetuity without a legislative piece on this hand. He has to appease his base,” said Rodriguez, noting that the president has promised the building of a wall and other border security measures since his 2016 campaign.

Salguero says if the president ends DACA it will cost Florida $1.5 billion in annual losses to its gross domestic product. That’s because Dreamers pay taxes, pay for their education and contribute to the local and state economy.

The Christian humanitarian group World Relief is urging Congress to protect Dreamers saying, “It would be unjust to punish these individuals for a decision made, in most cases, by their parents.”

A number of Christian colleges and universities joined with other higher education institutions this year to urge the president to support Dreamers. They include: Azusa Pacific University, Bethel University, Fuller Theological Seminary, Gordon Conwell Theological Seminary, John Brown University and Point Loma Nazarene University.

Daniela and Andrea Gonzales are among the Dreamers waiting to see what the president will decide. They arrived in the U.S. with their parents as children and have since gone on to study and work under the DACA program. Without it, their futures remain uncertain at best.

The president appeared to soften his stance on Dreamers this year after harsh anti-immigrant rhetoric during his campaign.

Earlier this year he explained, “It’s a very, very tough subject. We are going to deal with DACA with heart,” he said. But then he added, “I have to deal with a lot of politicians don’t forget.”

 

This Post Originally appeared here: https://www1.cbn.com/cbnnews/us/2017/august/latino-evangelicals-pressure-president-to-help-immigrant-dreamers

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Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, President of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference, Applauds Independent Peer Review of State Accountability Plans

“Not only does this review identify a set of best practices that will help states improve their plans, they have also drawn attention to a glaring hole in the state plans that have already been submitted to the U.S. Department of Education…”

—Rev. Samuel Rodriguez

 

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Rev. Dr. Samuel Rodriguez, President of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference, issues the following statement in reaction to the Collaborative for Student Success’ Check State Plans project released Tuesday, June 27, 2017:

“Today, the Collaborative for Student Success released what I believe, represents a landmark achievement in the discussion surrounding public education (K-12) accountability. While most agree districts and schools must and should serve all of its students well, these statements are seldom backed up with specific measures outlining what good accountability looks like, especially regarding educational equity for Hispanics, minorities and lower-income students.

“The Collaborative’s Check State Plans project changes that. By working hand-in-hand with Bellwether Education Partners, their peer review of state accountability plans provides states across the country with a set of comprehensive feedback from education experts that will help to move our nation closer to ensuring all of America’s students, regardless of race, income or ZIP code, have access to a high quality, public education.

“Not only does this review identify a set of best practices that will help states improve their plans, they have also drawn attention to a glaring hole in the state plans that have already been submitted to the U.S. Department of Education: none of the 17 plans that they reviewed adequately address how they will ensure a high-quality education for all students. Effective accountability clearly impacts education equality, one of the most critical social justice issues of our time, and the Check State Plans projects underscores the fact that there is more work to do. I applaud the Collaborative for Student Success for their leadership in this important area.”

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Rev. Samuel Rodriguez is president of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference. He has been named by CNN and Fox News as “the leader of the Hispanic Evangelical movement” and TIME Magazine nominated him among the 100 most influential leaders in America. 

NHCLC/CONEL is the world’s largest Hispanic Christian organization. It serves as a representative voice for the more than 100 million Hispanic Evangelicals assembled in over 40,000 U.S. churches and another 500,000 congregations spread throughout the Spanish-speaking diaspora. 

Website | www.nhclc.org Twitter | @nhclc 

 

Faith and Education Coalition is an initiative of the National Hispanic Christian Leaders Conference (NHCLC). With 2,568 members representing almost 3,000 local churches in 44 states, the Faith and Education Coalition advocates for high-quality education options for all of America’s children.

 

Website | www.faithandeducation.com

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Major Christian groups praise Trump’s decision to maintain Obama-era DACA program

The Christian humanitarian organization World Relief as well as the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference have praised President Donald Trump for maintaining an Obama-era policy that protects young, illegal immigrants.

On Thursday, Trump officially rescinded the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA), which was passed in 2014, but never went into effect, while he kept intact DAPA’s sister program, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA).

To date, the DACA program has allowed some 800,000 young immigrants who illegally entered the U.S. as minors to remain in the country, protecting them from the threat of deportation and enabling them to obtain employment authorization.

“We’re very grateful that President Trump and his administration have made this decision,” Scott Arbeiter, president of World Relief, said in a statement obtained by TheBlaze. “It’s a huge relief for many young people whom we serve. It was a wise and compassionate decision, consistent with the biblical values that compel us to pursue just and compassionate treatment for immigrants and to have a particular concern for children.”

World Relief, which criticized Trump in January for seeking to implement a travel ban that has since been blocked from implementation, provides legal services to several illegal immigrants who apply for so-called “Dreamer” status.

“As we interact with DACA applicants on a day-to-day basis, we hear the individual stories of lives transformed by this program,” Courtney Tudi, director of immigrant legal services for World Relief, said.

And the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference offered similar acclaim for the White House’s decision.

The Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, president of the NHCLC, commended Trump “in the highest possible terms” for maintaining his predecessor’s policy regarding those brought to the U.S. as children.

“These young men and women were brought to this country not by their own choice,” he said, “but they grew up in this country and have become as American as any other American.”

He went on to describe the president’s decision to maintain DACA as “exhibit A of the administration listening to and cooperating with the Hispanic community, and we commend him for it.”

In late January, NHCLC Vice President Tony Suarez told TheBlaze that the White House arranged a phone call with Hispanic leaders of several different Christian denominations to discuss how the Trump administration would address “Dreamers.”

And in a phone interview Friday afternoon, Suarez, who said he was “very encouraged” by this week’s decision, highlighted the importance of keeping families together, urging Democrats and Republicans on Capitol Hill to come together to pass comprehensive immigration reform.

“[Maintaining DACA] places the priority on families,” he told TheBlaze. “That we cannont separate families. … We have to remember that these ‘Dreamers’ are not here because of any fault of their own. They didn’t choose to cross the border, they didn’t choose to come without a passport or without proper documentation.”

He said the Obama-era policy “protects” children and families from being torn apart. Ultimately, though, he said keeping DACA isn’t enough — the White House needs to implement a policy, not unlike DAPA, to protect parents.

“This is the beginning of several steps that need to take place for a true immigration reform to fully be executed,” Suarez noted.

Moving forward, the NHCLC leader said it is up to Congress to take action, to pass a bipartisan, sweeping immigration reform.

“In the same manner that an executive action by President [Barack] Obama could not dictate immigration policy — we’re still left waiting for Congress to act [under Trump],” Suarez said. “And they have promised for — at this point — decades to act. For the last 30 years.”

“It’s time,” he added. “[T]hey need to get this done.”

Trump’s decision to maintain the DACA program marks a shift from his campaign promise to “immediately terminate” the policy, which — at the time — he described as an “illegal executive amnesty.”

Since taking office, though, the president had been softening his perspective on the issue. During a February press conference from the White House, Trump vowed to treat DACA immigrants “with heart.” He said dealing with DACA is “a very, very difficult subject for me.”

“To me, it’s one of the most difficult subjects I have because you have these incredible kids — in many cases, not in all cases,” Trump said. “In some of the cases, they’re having DACA and they’re gang members and they’re drug members, too. But you have some absolutely incredible kids — I would say mostly — they were brought in here in such a way. It’s a very, very tough subject.”

Original post can be read here: http://www.theblaze.com/news/2017/06/16/major-christian-groups-praise-trumps-decision-to-maintain-obama-era-daca-program/

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Secretary DeVos should make the education of minority children her No. 1 priority

Dr. Andrea Ramirez, Executive Director of the NHCLC’s Faith and Education Coalition, encourages Secretary DeVos to ensure that marginalized children are the Department of Education’s highest priority. #FoxNews #NHCLC #FaithandEducation [READ ARTICLE HERE:http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2017/03/18/secretary-devos-should-make-education-minority-children-her-no-1-priority.html ]

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A discussion on the challenges facing Hispanic education today

A Q&A with David Park of Learning Heroes: parents are the key to education

Last week, during President Trump’s address to a joint session of Congress, he declared education to be “the civil rights issues of our time,” echoing similar statements by past Presidents Barack Obama and George W. Bush. I couldn’t agree more.

Hispanics and other minorities comprise a growing proportion of the student population in America, and yet their test scores continue to lag dangerously behind white counterparts. As such, education equality is the frontline of the battle for America’s future. That’s why this week I want to highlight the incredible work of David Park of Learning Heroes, to get his perspective on this critical issue. My hope is that his insights will give parents practical tools they can use to help ensure their child’s success in the classroom.

SR: What do you see as the greatest challenges in education today?

DP: There are certainly challenges in education, but there are also tremendous opportunities – so let’s start there. We know from our national survey, Parents 2016, that K-8 parents and guardians have high aspirations for their children. 83% of African American parents and 90% of Hispanic parents believe that a two- or four-year college degree is very important.
A big challenge, however, is that too many young people are still unprepared for success after high school. In fact, 60% of first-year college students need to take remedial courses to help them catch up to a college level. Research also shows that parents play a critical role in their child’s academic progress – and that’s where Learning Heroes comes in.

SR: How does Learning Heroes help parents to get involved?

DP: At Learning Heroes, our number one goal is to equip parents with information, resources, and simple actions to take to support their children’s success. According to a RAND study, families may have four-to-eight times more impact on student achievement than teachers (and teachers are obviously incredibly important). But many parents need some help identifying what they can do to best support their child in school.

The first step for parents is to understand where your child excels and where he or she needs additional support. As a group, 87% of Hispanic parents believe their child is at or above grade level in math (NAEP scores tell us reality is 26%); and 84% in reading (reality is 21%).

SR: How can parents get a more accurate picture of their child’s academic achievement?

DP: Together, teacher feedback, grades, parent observations, and the upcoming annual state test results can give parents a good picture of whether their child is performing at grade level and whether he or she will be prepared for success next year. Our website, BeALearningHero.org features tools and resources in English and Spanish from trusted organizations all in one place – organizations such as Scholastic, National PTA, GreatSchools and others.

SR: After so many states adopted new standards, how are we now testing students?

DP: The Common Core debate has left a lot of parents confused about testing standards. The bottom line is that each state must measure every child’s progress in reading and math in grades 3-8 and at least once during grades 10-12.

SR: Why is the annual state test so important?

DP: Annual state test results help parents understand how prepared their child will be for the next grade. Combined with grades and classroom work, the state test can help a parent know how well their child is meeting grade level expectations in math and English Language Arts.

SR: What are some tips for parents as they help their children get ready for the annual state test?

DP: Parents can help reduce anxiety and uncertainty by checking out sample test questions or even reviewing a practice test, all of which are available at our website. We’ve also created an online guide, “Ready for the Test,” which is available in English and Spanish. “Ready for the Test” includes lots of other state specific information and tips – from looking at last year’s test results, to talking to the teacher about the test, tackling test nerves and more.

SR: What are some other Learning Heroes resources in English and Spanish? How have you seen these strategies benefit both children and parents?

DP: Most of our resources are available in both English and Spanish. A good example of a helpful English/Spanish resource is our Readiness Roadmap, which was developed in partnership with Univision and National PTA. The Readiness Roadmap is a guide that helps parents understand each stage of their child’s development—from what children are expected to know each grade year and how parents can support social, emotional and academic learning at home, to starting the college planning process and more.

Based on an initial study conducted earlier this year and from what we’ve seen in communities where we’re working, we know that the strategy of meeting parents where they are and providing them with actionable resources is having a very significant and positive impact in terms of parent knowledge, skills and actions on behalf of their child’s academic success. The fact of the matter is, parents are the key and the data supports this. That’s why Learning Heroes exists, to help parents help their children succeed.

Faith and Education Coalition is an initiative of the National Hispanic Christian Leaders Conference (NHCLC), with 2,568 members representing almost 3,000 local churches in 44 states.

Original article can be read here: http://www.univision.com/univision-news/opinion/a-discussion-on-the-challenges-facing-hispanic-education-today

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Faith Leaders Seek to Bridge Education, Minority Gap

Faith leaders are meeting in Atlanta this week to discuss church strategies to promote education among minority youth.

Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, president of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference (NHCLC), and Elder Bernice King, CEO of the King Center and daughter of the late Martin Luther King, led the sessions on behalf of the NHCLC’s Faith and Education Coalition.

The two spoke to CBN’s Heather Sells about how churches can encourage educational opportunity and equity in urban and minority communities.

http://www.cbn.com/cbnnews/us/2015/March/Faith-Leaders-Seek-to-Bridge-Education-Minority-Gap/

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NHCLC Announces Dr. Andrea R. Ramirez as Executive Director of Faith and Education Coalition

SACRAMENTO, Calif.June 12, 2015 /PRNewswire/ — The National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference (NHCLC/Conel) has appointed Dr. Andrea R. Ramirez as Executive Director of the Faith & Education Coalition. Dr. Ramirez will oversee key education initiatives for the NHCLC including their annual Education Sunday, the Raising the Standards project, and the Faith & Education Coalition. Dr. Ramirez will also direct strategic planning for the Hispanic Education Summit. She brings to this new role her broad experience as an academic, curriculum developer, and organizational leader. Dr. Carlos Campo, who led the NHCLC’s education initiative for the past year, will continue serving as Chair for the Alliance of Hispanic Education as he assumes a new role as President of Ashland University.

“We are honored to have Dr. Andrea Ramirez step into this vital leadership role,” comments Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, President of NHCLC/Conel. “She is uniquely equipped to lead our education initiatives, with a strong academic background as well as a passion for Latino student success. I’m excited to have her skills dedicated at this nexus of biblical justice – the crossroads of faith and education.”

Dr. Ramirez (MBA, PhD in Organizational Leadership) is leading strategic planning for Education Sunday, observed annually on the first Sunday of September (September 6, 2015) in thousands of Hispanic churches. Local church leaders can sign up for Education Sunday and download resources at www.FaithandEducation.com. Ramirez encourages churches to make a difference for their students as they return to school this fall: “In light of the crisis in our country where the quality of children’s education is often dictated by zip code, Education Sunday calls upon the family of faith to get involved. Together we can help close the education equality gap for Hispanic students.”

“Education Sunday is just the beginning. We urge church leaders to go before the Father to ask for wisdom on how to best support students in their local communities,” says Ramirez. “As we commit ourselves to raising the standards for high and equal education across all states, we are empowering the next generation to love the Lord with all of their minds.”

NHCLC/CONEL education initiatives and resources are found online at www.faithandeducation.com, alongside links to Christian university and seminary partners.

NHCLC/CONEL is the world’s largest Hispanic Christian organization. It serves as a representative voice for the more than 100 million Hispanic Evangelicals assembled in over 40,000 U.S. churches and another 500,000 congregations spread throughout the Spanish-speaking diaspora. For additional information, visit http://www.nhclc.org.

SOURCE National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference

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Military Families Get Short-Changed in Education: They Deserve Better

At seven years old, I learned about the harsh realities of the world. Due to racial prejudice my parents moved the family from South Texas to California. It was difficult leaving family, friends, and a school where I excelled academically. After attending the final months of first grade, my parents were told that I was lacking in educational fundamentals, was not ready to move on to second grade, and would have a difficult repeat of first grade due to the challenging academic standards of the California school systems. My parents were stunned, I ranked at the top of my class in Texas. But the school in California had much higher academic standards

Think about that: I did not have the reading, writing and math skills necessary to start second grade in California. Fortunately, my mother was a high school graduate. She persuaded administrators to provide text books and assignments for a complete summer review of first grade. She spent the summer teaching me – four hours every day in preparation for an opportunity to be retested by school administrators. We were successful. I passed the test and was able to proceed with peers to second grade. She overcame discouragement and disappointment in order to give me an opportunity to stay on course academically for my age. She knew that being held back would be devastating for me.

To this day, I am thankful for the sacrifice of my parents. Mom was not able to work and add to the family finances because of her commitment to teach me. I do not know how many other parents have experienced this shock and disappointment because of varying academic standards. For most parents and families, a summer committed to teaching is not an option. Nevertheless, we celebrated the blessings and favor of God through a difficult academic challenge that paved the way toward achievement of future academic goals.

image: http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/pagead/adview?ai=BDRjSU1uVVfvQIMPd-QOzrpPwDbCZjKIGAAAAEAEgsNnrGjgAWNiJ_JGYAmDJjviGyKP8GrIBFXd3dy5jaHJpc3RpYW5wb3N0LmNvbboBCWdmcF9pbWFnZcgBCdoBHWh0dHA6Ly93d3cuY2hyaXN0aWFucG9zdC5jb20vmAK4F8ACAuACAOoCFi83MjQxL2NwX3d3dy9BUlRfT09QXzH4AvTRHpADrAKYA-ADqAMB4AQBkAYBoAYg2AcA&sigh=mNpMbH-NCIE&cid=5Ghaxv02BaUGtGbxSjvTiMdI&adurl=

Some may see as a small accomplishment in light of the problems of the world. How many problems we could solve if everyone benefited from consistent high quality education that begins right from the start.

While my experience was unique, I wonder about the academic anxieties experienced by parents who move from one state to another because of job opportunities. I am concerned for military families who face the same challenges when moving from one state to another. On average, military families will move six to nine times during the course of the career of at least one active-duty parent. Every single one of those children deserves better than to hear that their academic progress is below grade-level at a new school because of varied state academic standards.

The U.S. Army will soon be releasing the results of a study of local schools surrounding its bases. A report advancing that, called the Stimson Report, notes that some of the communities around bases with low-performing schools are in states with lesser education standards. The Army’s commitment to meeting the needs of its soldiers and their families may very well shift resources to states with lower academic standards to fulfill the promise of a high-quality education for military children.

As a board member of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference serving 40,000+ Evangelical churches in the United States, I am committed to seeing that Hispanic children have the same opportunities as other students. The Bible speaks of justice. It is unjust for parents and students to face living in a mobile society where varied academic standards exist from state to state.

Despite an improvement in educational outcomes over the last 20 years, Hispanic students still graduate from high school at a rate 10 percent lower than white students. These statistics should concern the military. In 2011, 16.9 percent of new recruits were Hispanics, and Hispanics make up more than 11 percent of active-duty forces, according to the Department of Defense.

I take great pride in serving my country through the United States Marine Corps. I know that tens of thousands of other Hispanics share pride in their military service for our country. They also take pride in their families, by ensuring their children and grandchildren have the tools for academic success. Hispanic parents are keenly aware that the road to success begins with a high-quality education, so we’re pleased to see states working to address the patchwork of academic standards that still exists. Common goals and standards which can be compared across states are offering hope for military families, migrant families, every American family. Our shared hope is for our children’s futures, where there are consistently high academic standards for all.
Read more at http://www.christianpost.com/news/military-families-get-short-changed-in-education-they-deserve-the-better-141045/#WpR4zXIhSyiEPbS0.99

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Hispanic Evangelicals Coast-to-Coast Share Single Focus On Education Sunday: ‘Love the Lord With All Our Minds’

WASHINGTONSept. 1, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — The National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference (NHCLC/CONEL), the nation’s leading organization for 16 million Hispanic American Evangelicals, celebrates its annual Education Sunday on September 6, 2015. The NHCLC invites churches across the nation to pray for and support the students in their congregations and communities, including those in home, private and public schools. Education Sunday equips parents to take an active role in their children’s education and empowers congregations to actively support high academic achievement for all children in their community.

Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, founder and president of NHCLC/CONEL and a former public school educator, views education equity as a matter of biblical justice. “It’s time to remind Americans that we are not only one nation under God, but we are also a nation of liberty and justice for all. We will bring biblical justice to our nation’s public classrooms when academic achievement is no longer dependent upon a student’s zip code, ethnicity or income. And we will truly love our neighbors as ourselves when we love their students as our own.”

Education Sunday is a dedicated time for congregations to pray for their students and teachers, affirm the value of education, and invite the congregation to support local schools and students. Dr. Andrea Ramirez, Executive Director of the Faith & Education Coalition – NHCLC, describes the heart behind Education Sunday 2015: “This year we are focusing on Jesus’ command to ‘love the Lord with all our minds and to love our neighbors as ourselves’ from Luke 10:27. Education Sunday focuses our hearts on equipping students – the children in our homes as well as the children in our communities. By taking steps to support local schools, our hope is to honor the ‘Imago Dei’ in every child. Because every child is created in God’s image, each one has the potential for loving God with all of his or her mind.”

The NHCLC hosts a resource website, http://www.FaithandEducation.com, for parents and pastors. Tools for churches are provided at the site, including Education Sunday bilingual resources, as well as a variety of tools and information for parents. Resources include:

  • Parent Toolkit: parents can plan for a successful school year with tips for student success, parent-teacher conference guides, suggestions for homework help, help discovering local afterschool care, and links to academic standards by grade level
  • Education Sunday support: information and ideas for this year’s event include a sample sermon, original song, Bible studies and more
  • Scholarship Information: students can enter a scholarship contest by submitting a 60-second video of what Education Sunday looked like at their church. By participating in Education Sunday, churches and their students become eligible for other scholarship opportunities through the year.

“Hispanic parents care deeply about education,” comments Dr. Carlos Campo, President of Ashland University and founder of the Faith & Education Coalition. “They are eager to see their children graduate high school and attend college, even if no one else in their family has accomplished that goal. But far too many graduates require remedial classes at college, because they weren’t held to rigorous high school standards. Our students deserve better, and Christians can lead the way.”

The NHCLC, which values Education as one of its core directives, advocates for Hispanic student success including education equity and high academic standards for all students as a part of its mission as a Christian organization.

NHCLC/CONEL is the world’s largest Hispanic Christian organization. It serves as a representative voice for the more than 100 million Hispanic Evangelicals assembled in over 40,000 U.S. churches and another 500,000 congregations spread throughout the Spanish-speaking diaspora. For additional information, visit http://www.nhclc.org.

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Hispanic Evangelicals Unite Around Education Equity

The National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference (NHCLC/CONEL), the nation’s leading organization for 16 million Hispanic American Evangelicals, celebrates its annual Education Sunday on September 6, 2015.

The NHCLC invites churches across the nation to pray for and support the students in their congregations and communities, including those in home, private and public schools. Education Sunday equips parents to take an active role in their children’s education and empowers congregations to actively support high academic achievement for all children in their community.

Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, founder and president of NHCLC/CONEL and a former public school educator, views education equity as a matter of biblical justice.

“It’s time to remind Americans that we are not only one nation under God, but we are also a nation of liberty and justice for all. We will bring biblical justice to our nation’s public classrooms when academic achievement is no longer dependent upon a student’s zip code, ethnicity or income. And we will truly love our neighbors as ourselves when we love their students as our own.”

Education Sunday is a dedicated time for congregations to pray for their students and teachers, affirm the value of education, and invite the congregation to support local schools and students.

Dr. Andrea Ramirez, Executive Director of the Faith & Education Coalition-NHCLC, describes the heart behind Education Sunday 2015: “This year we are focusing on Jesus’ command to ‘love the Lord with all our minds and to love our neighbors as ourselves’ from Luke 10:27. Education Sunday focuses our hearts on equipping students—the children in our homes as well as the children in our communities. By taking steps to support local schools, our hope is to honor the ‘Imago Dei’ in every child. Because every child is created in God’s image, each one has the potential for loving God with all of his or her mind.”

The NHCLC hosts a resource website for parents and pastors. Tools for churches are provided at the site, including Education Sunday bilingual resources, as well as a variety of tools and information for parents. Resources include:

  • Parent Toolkit: parents can plan for a successful school year with tips for student success, parent-teacher conference guides, suggestions for homework help, help discovering local after-school care, and links to academic standards by grade level
  • Education Sunday support: information and ideas for this year’s event include a sample sermon, original song, Bible studies and more
  • Scholarship Information: students can enter a scholarship contest by submitting a 60-second video of what Education Sunday looked like at their church. By participating in Education Sunday, churches and their students become eligible for other scholarship opportunities through the year.

“Hispanic parents care deeply about education,” comments Dr. Carlos Campo, President of Ashland University and founder of the Faith & Education Coalition. “They are eager to see their children graduate high school and attend college, even if no one else in their family has accomplished that goal. But far too many graduates require remedial classes at college, because they weren’t held to rigorous high school standards. Our students deserve better, and Christians can lead the way.”

The NHCLC, which values Education as one of its core directives, advocates for Hispanic student success including education equity and high academic standards for all students as a part of its mission as a Christian organization.

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