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Evangelical leaders call for prayers after Florida school shooting

Several evangelical leaders have called for prayers after the mass shooting at a Florida high school that resulted in the deaths of more than a dozen people.

On Wednesday afternoon, Nikolas Cruz, 19, gunned down students and staff at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, killing at least 17 and injuring dozens of others.

Evangelical leaders immediately called for prayers following the incident, with some expressing grief over the prevalence of school shootings in the U.S.

“Let every American stop what he or she is doing, and call out to God on behalf of all America’s students, that God would spare our nation of ever again having to mourn such a senseless loss of life at our children’s schools,” said Rev. Dr. Samuel Rodriguez, President of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference.

Pastor Greg Laurie, senior pastor of Harvest Christian Fellowship in Riverside, California, pointed out that the latest incident in Florida came only three weeks after a school shooting in Kentucky.

“Students should never be afraid to step onto their school’s campus, and parents should never have to see images of their children fleeing the scene of a shooting on the news,” Laurie said, according to Charisma.

“Let us pray for God’s comfort for all the victims and let us never grow tired of praying that these types of mass shootings will one day soon come to an end in America,” he continued.

Evangelist Franklin Graham took to Facebook on Wednesday to ask Christians to pray for the students, staff and families affected by the latest mass shooting and urged them to include law enforcement and first responders in their prayers as well.

Cruz, who was armed with at least one AR-15 rifle and “multiple magazines,” was reportedly a former student at the school but had been expelled for unknown “disciplinary reasons” last year.

The authorities are now investigating whether the suspect may have pulled the fire alarm to draw more people out into the halls before he opened fire.

Some students said they thought that they heard the fire alarm go off right before the first shots were fired and many were in the process of evacuating. Many students were said to be confused as a fire drill had already taken place earlier that day.

The police who arrived at the scene had learned that the gunman tried to conceal himself among the hundreds of students fleeing the school. The gunman was arrested about an hour after the shooting broke out when he was cornered by the police in a nearby neighborhood.

On Thursday, officials announced that Cruz has been charged with 17 counts of premeditated murder.

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This Is the Fastest-Growing Segment of Christianity in America – The Answer May Surprise You

While Congress has yet to decide the future of the country’s illegal immigrants, some say they are critical to the survival of Christianity in America.

“Every denomination is experiencing explosive growth within the Latino church and the immigrant church at large. It’s been this way now for several decades,” Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, president of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference, told CBN News. “This is a perpetual revival, if you will, and it’s not going to cease and it’s growing and we thank God for it.”

Rodriguez says Americans can fulfill the great commission by ministering to their immigrant neighbors next door.

“For so many years we thought that harvest was over international waters. But we’re seeing that same harvest taking place right here in the United States,” he explained.

The Fairmeadows Baptist Church in Duncanville, Texas has grown exponentially since it started evangelizing in the local immigrant community.

What started out as a church with little more than a dozen members has quickly grown to 80 members after opening its doors to the large Hispanic immigrant community nearby. Today, the church is home to a Hispanic congregation called Erez Baptist Church, which boasts a vibrant youth music group and sponsors missionary work in Brazil.

“Everything we do is about making disciples,” Rodriguez told NPR. He founded the Erez Baptist congregation in December 2016,

This comes at a time when Americans are increasingly turning away from religion. In fact, illegal immigrants are starting to make disciples of Americans.

“There was a time when immigrant churches were meeting in the basements or the Sunday school rooms of primarily Anglo churches, but now they own church properties and they start English ministries. There’s a reverse missions approach,” Rodriguez said.

While this is good news for a number of immigrant church leaders, Rodriguez argues mass deportations and bad U.S. immigration policy could jeopardize the future of Christianity in America.

“You could cripple the North American church,” he said. “I think there’s spiritual implications to the policy behind it because I see this large revival, this large growth of the church, and if there was mass deportation you could cause the closure of immigrant churches throughout the country.”

“I mean, imagine the spiritual implications. Christianity would immediately go into decline,” he continued.

Rodrigeuz urged American believers to see immigration beyond just a mere political issue, but a spiritual issue.

“We need to see this through the eyes of Jesus,” he said. “I can’t speak for all 14 million undocumented immigrants, but there’s a large majority who are coming to the feet of Christ and they want to do things right.”

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Florida school shooting: America must ‘call on the Lord’ after 17 killed in deadly attack

At least 17 people are dead in yet another horrific school shooting in the US after a teenage gunman opened fire on Marjory Stoneman Douglas high school in Parkland, Florida, with an AR-15 assault rifle.

The suspect has been named as 19-year-old Nikolas Cruz, a former pupil who was expelled from the school. It is the 18th school shooting incident in 2018 alone and the deadliest since 26 people were killed at Sandy Hook school in 2012.

Three were shot dead outside the school when the attack began at 14.30 local time (19.30GMT) before the attacker went inside the building and killed another 12, Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel told reporters. Another two later died in hospital. Some victims are still being identified and three people remain in a critical condition while three others are in stable condition.

‘It’s catastrophic. There really are no words,’ Sheriff Israel tweeted later.

President Trump offered his ‘prayers and condolences’ and tweeted that ‘no child, teacher or anyone else should ever feel unsafe in an American school’.

Evangelical leaders also expressed their horror in the aftermath of the shooting. Out of Trump’s primary evangelical advisers, no one raised the question of whether tighter gun laws might have prevented the attack.

Paula White, who pastors New Destiny Christian Center in Apopka, Florida, and is Trump’s closest spiritual adviser, said it was ‘horrifying’ to see another school shooting.

‘As a mother and a grandmother, I grieve for the victims who have had their lives and futures stolen from them, and for the families who are left to cope with the aftermath of this terrible tragedy,’ she said in a statement. ‘We pray that God would be close to the brokenhearted, as He promises us in scripture He will be, and that the community of Parkland will be comforted in their time of need.’

Dr Ronnie Floyd, president of the National Day of Prayer Task Force, said America must ‘call on the Lord’ in response.

‘Let us pray for the victims of this terrible attack and their families the way we would like others to pray for us,’ he said in a statement. ‘It’s in times like these when we need God’s presence and comfort the most. May God be with all of us and our nation.’

Rev Samuel Rodriguez, President of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference, said he was ‘heartbroken and deeply troubled’ for America in the wake of the attack.

‘Let every American stop what he or she is doing, and call out to God on behalf of all of America’s students, that God would spare our nation of ever again having to mourn such a senseless loss of life at our children’s schools,’ he said.

The attack is the 18th on or around school premises so far in 2018 alone, according to research by by Everytown for Gun Safety, and the sixth school shooting incident in 2018 that has either wounded or killed students.

One student, Bailey Vosberg, said: ‘I heard what sounded like fireworks and I looked at my friend and he asked me if I heard that.’

He added, according to the BBC: ‘Immediately, I knew. I didn’t say anything to him, I just hopped over the fence and I went straight to the road that our school is located on – and as I got there there was just Swat cars and police units, police vehicles just flying by, helicopters over the top of us.’

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Evangelical Leaders Be part of Forces To Urge Safety For Dreamers And Refugees

One hundred evangelical leaders have signed a letter urging President and members of to protect , and .

The letter, spearheaded by the evangelical organization World Relief, was . It was supported by leaders from across the nation and from different streams of evangelicalism, including Dr. Russell Moore of the Southern Baptist Convention’s ; Jen Hatmaker, the ; and , president of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference.

An  had received more than 1,400 signatures by Wednesday afternoon.

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Max Lucado, Beth Moore, and Hundreds of Evangelicals Call for Immigration Reform … Again

This time last year, just weeks into Donald Trump’s presidency, evangelical leaders spoke out in an unprecedented way against his temporary refugee ban with hundreds signing on to an open letter published in the Washington Post.

Rallied by World Relief, the humanitarian arm of the National Association of Evangelicals (NAE), the group took out another full-page ad in the newspaper to bring up multiple concerns related to immigration policy in 2018. (The ad appears at the end of this post.)

Yet again, the list contains both vocal advocates as well as pastors not typically known for speaking out on political matters, topped by influential voices like pastor and devotional author Max Lucado, Bible teacher Beth Moore, and Village Church pastor Matt Chandler.

“As Christian leaders, we have a commitment to caring for the vulnerable in our churches while also supporting just, compassionate and welcoming policies toward refugees and other immigrants,” the letter opens, going on to request legal protection for the Dreamers who entered the US as children, an increase in the admittance of refugees and persecuted Christians, and quicker priority for immigrants seeking to reunite with their families.

Also listed among the hundred-plus initial signatories are Jen Hatmaker, Ann Voskamp, Willow Creek’s Bill and Lynne Hybels, and Christianity Today president Harold Smith. More than 1,300 Christian supporters have signed the letter online.

“We believe we represent a convergence of evangelical belief that care for [refugees] is a central part of our Christian faith,” said Jenny Yang, the vice president of advocacy and policy at World Relief.

As CT reported last month, when several Trump faith advisers met with Nancy Pelosi, evangelicals are mostly eager to find a solution for the young immigrants once protected from deportation through the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program:

Nearly 70 percent of evangelicals believe Dreamers should be allowed to stay in the country, with 49 percent supporting a path to citizenship and 20 percent believing they should become legal residents but not citizens, Politico/Morning Consult found. (Overall, 75 percent of registered voters want the Dreamers to stay.)

“Our prayer is that these young people would be allowed to continue contributing to our society without fear of deportation,” the February 7 letter stated.

The DACA phase-out begins in just less than a month, leaving advocates to push for a Congressional fix before then. Among the 700,000 or so Dreamers are plenty of young church leaders, students at Christian colleges, and even members of World Relief’s own staff.

“This is a unique moment that we’re standing in. There’s a deadline and a requirement to act on a certain issue,” said Senator James Lankford of Oklahoma, an evangelical who spoke to some of the letter’s signatories at a press conference in Washington on Wednesday.

“What I’m encouraging my colleagues to do is not stop the work… For these families that are waiting for the moment, they need to know what is the decision and what is the law.”

Fellow legislator Senator Angus King, an independent from Maine, referred to the ongoing debate over immigration in Congress as “a unique opportunity for us to carry out our moral and ethical responsibilities at the same time as we carry out our legal and political responsibilities.” He told evangelical leaders, “If there was ever a time for prayer it’s in the next 24 hours.”

Evangelicals have been speaking up for Dreamers in particular since the fall. Dozens of evangelical and Southern Baptist leaders gathered by Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission (ERLC) president Russell Moore signed onto a statement including positions like:

  • “We believe it is unjust to punish children for offenses they did not commit.”
  • “We believe we should welcome Dreamers of good moral character and who are working hard to contribute to our country.”
  • “We believe our government should provide a pathway to permanent legal status and/or citizenship for eligible Dreamers.”

Moore repeated his concern for this group of young immigrants on Wednesday, saying, “As Christians, dreamers are not some abstract category for us. Dreamers are teaching Sunday school … Dreamers are leading churches. When we see Dreamers in jeopardy, we see all of us in jeopardy.”

Shirley V. Hoogstra spoke as president of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU).

“We love our DACA students. These students are courageous, they are brave, and they are resilient,” she said. “These students deserve an opportunity to pursue an education without fear of deportation.”

Today’s letter also provided an update on the flow of refugees into the US, which fell from 96,874 in 2016 to 33,368 in 2017.

The number of Christian refugees from Iraq, Iran, and Syria—which have long rankedamong the top countries for Christian persecution—has dropped by 60 percent over that period. (Last year, Pew Research Center found that Christians still outpace Muslims—or any other religion—among refugees to the US.)

“Over the past decade, more of those admitted to the US have been Christians than those of any other faith background, so the dramatic reduction in refugee arrivals this year means far fewer persecuted Christians will have the opportunity to rebuild their lives in safety in the US,” World Relief president Scott Arbeiter said last summer.

Based on the arrivals so far, 2018 is on track to bring in the lowest number of refugees since the resettlement program was formalized in 1980.

“This, at a time when there are more refugees in the world than ever before in recorded history,” the letter said. “Our prayer is that the U.S. would continue to be a beacon of hope for those fleeing persecution.”

The cap for the 2018 fiscal year, as established by the Trump administration, is 45,000, and some predict arrivals won’t even make it close to that. Last year, refugee resettlement agencies reached the 50,000 cap in mid-July, a couple months before the end of the fiscal year on September 30.

Anticipating the drop, World Relief closed five offices and laid off 140 staff members in the wake of last year’s refugee ban, which ended up disputed back and forth in the courts. The organization has not been forced to make further cuts since.

The organization’s director of church mobilization, Matthew Soerens, wrote last week in The New York Times:

The past year has been a disaster for refugees and for those of us who are deeply concerned — many because of the convictions of our faith — with their well-being. But, because of my Christian faith, I also believe that people can repent, turning from a wrong direction and moving in the right way.

It’s not too late for our leaders to examine the facts, apply the values of the faith traditions that inspire many Americans’ concern for refugees, and change course.

As the Trump administration has shifted policies on undocumented immigrants and individuals with temporary protected status (TPS), putting more individuals at risk of deportation, Christians have quickly brought up the dilemma of mixed-status families, whose children are US citizens but parents are not.

Last year, World Relief and other agencies saw a spike in inquiries from Christian immigrants concerned about their status and worried about themselves or family members getting deported. CT reported:

Half of all Latino Christians living in the United States are worried that either they or someone close to them will be deported, the Pew Research Center found. This includes 1 in 3 of those born in the US (including Puerto Rico).

Among Latino Christians, the concerns are highest among green card holders (71% worry about deportation) and undocumented immigrants (68% worry). Even among Hispanic Christians who were born outside of America but have become US citizens, more than half (55%) fear deportation for themselves or someone close to them.

The letter also asks politicians to consider families waiting for reunification, such as refugees or other immigrants applying to enter the US to be with their spouses, parents, or kids.

“God ordained the family as the cornerstone of society, and we believe that our country is stronger when our citizens can be quickly reunited with their close family members,” it said. “For some U.S. citizens, the waiting period can be years or even decades. We pray you will respect the unity of the family.”

Samuel Rodriguez, president of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference (NHCLC) and an adviser to President Trump, has repeatedly pled for policies that allow families to stay together.

Moore’s statement in October also included the line: “We believe a just government works to maintain the integrity of families.”

CT has recently reported on a ruling on behalf of Indonesian Christians in New Englandwho face deportation, the impact of the end of TPS protections on Salvadoran Christians in the US, and the nomination of an evangelical leader to serve as the next director general of the United Nations’s International Organization for Migration (IOM).

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Praying, Pleading, for Consensus That Protects Dreamers

“Hope deferred makes the heart sick,” the Bible tells us. Regrettably, Dreamers throughout the country have lived that experience repeatedly in recent months.

By Rev. Samuel Rodriguez And Abigail Molina

“Hope deferred makes the heart sick,” the Bible tells us.

Regrettably, Dreamers throughout the country have lived that experience repeatedly in recent months and in new ways in recent days. The creation of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program in 2012 was life-changing for hundreds of thousands of young people—but the announcement of its termination last September meant, barring legislative intervention, that they would lose their jobs and potentially even face deportation. Reports of a bipartisan “deal” gave us new hope—only for it to be dashed within hours. We’re fervently praying that our elected officials will come together quickly to find consensus.

We write, respectively, as the leader of a network of more than forty thousand Hispanic evangelical congregations and as a staff member at one of those local churches—World Impact Center – Impacto de Fe in Commerce City, Colorado—whose employment is possible only because of the DACA program.

My (Abigail’s) story is similar in many ways to those of tens of thousands of others within churches that are represented by the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference (NHCLC). I arrived in the U.S. on a tourist visa with my family on July 4, 1999. I thought the fireworks were there to welcome us to our new home. But when my family overstayed their visas—a concept I could not understand as a small child—and became undocumented, our life was very challenging. When my friends were applying for driver’s licenses, I discovered I could not. Though I was a strong student, I was ineligible for federal financial aid or for in-state tuition rates, so I could only afford to attend college part-time.

My family and I found strength in our local church, though, and I genuinely believe it came as an answer to the prayers of many in that church and in churches throughout the country that the DACA program came about, allowing me to work lawfully, pay my taxes, pay my way through college, and give back, serving on the staff of a local elementary school and now at my church. I am so incredibly grateful for this country and the many blessings it has offered to me, and I desperately want to be able to continue to contribute. But, without congressional action, I will lose my work authorization next year—a message I conveyed to legislators as I joined a delegation of other Christian Dreamers in Washington, D.C. recently.

I (Samuel) meet young people like Abigail on a regular basis in my role with the NHCLC and within the church that I pastor in Sacramento, California. They want nothing more than to continue to live, work, and contribute, using the gifts that God has given each of them to their fullest potential. Their churches are standing with them in pleading with both Republicans and Democrats in Congress to come together to pass legislation.

But it’s not just Latino Christians who care about this: a  poll last fall found that more than 70 percent of evangelical Christians of all ethnicities support legislation to allow Dreamers to stay in the U.S. and keep their jobs. More than 60 percent of those who voted for President Trump want these individuals to be able to become U.S. citizens, according to a  Fox News poll. By roughly an eight-to-one margin, a recent  Quinnipiac University poll found, Americans prefer allowing Dreamers to stay to their deportation.

“Hope deferred makes the heart sick,” the author of Proverbs continues, “but a longing fulfilled is a tree of life.” Members of Congress from both parties can come together quickly to resolve their differences, and President Trump can have the opportunity to do something none of his predecessors have been able to do: offer real, permanent hope to young people who are Americans in every way except on paper. In doing so, we promise that they will bear fruit, giving back many times over to this great country.

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Getting the most out of our gifts

I’m superstitious, and I have my rituals.

When I write, I take several minutes to think about what I want to put on the literary canvas — and what to leave out.

When I talk on the lecture circuit, before I’m introduced I go to the restroom and splash cold water on my face.

When I host radio shows, before I utter a word I perform the sign of the cross and ask God to let me speak clearly.

When I go on television, if I’m in New York, I’ll duck into the quiet and stillness of St. Patrick’s Cathedral. I’ll sit in a pew and pray that, when the red light goes on, I’ll be able to communicate what I think and feel — in four minutes.

And when I need help with the big things — love, life, faith, family — I call a preacher.

Rev. Samuel Rodriguez is the leader of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference, which he founded in 2000 and which now represents more than 40,000 Evangelical Hispanic churches in the United States. The son of Puerto Rican parents is a former high school teacher who taught government and civics in the same Pennsylvania city in which he grew up, a place appropriately named Bethlehem.

Rodriguez is also my go-to-guy for personal growth and spiritual coaching. He started in that role a couple of years ago when, after interviewing him for a column, I meandered into a confession. I told him that — as a Catholic — I was trying to find my way back to God. Pastor Sam — as he is called — listened so passionately that I could feel the intensity coming through the phone line. Then he gave me some advice that helped.

Now I needed his advice again. What weighed on my mind was the task of making a living, and supporting one’s family, while using God’s gifts.

Last year, I turned 50. And I’m clear about what the ledger looks like. God didn’t give me musical, artistic or athletic ability. But he gave me this: the ability to communicate, in written or spoken form.

For that, I’m grateful. From that, I’ve built — from scratch — a good career as a national columnist and media commentator, becoming one of the few Latinos in the country who can lay claim to those titles. Not bad for the son of a cop, and the grandson of farm workers.

Now, my main industry — newspapers — is contracting, and newsrooms are shrinking. In nearly 30 years of writing for newspapers, hosting radio shows, offering TV commentary and the like, I’ve had more than two dozen jobs; I’ve lost six of them.

Almost eight years ago, I lost the highest paying job I’d ever had; two-thirds of my family’s income went out the window. But I hustled, picking up other part-time jobs to add to the ones I had. My wife went back to work. We pulled through.

But it hasn’t been easy. I often feel like that guy in the circus, spinning a dozen plates at the ends of sticks.

I could make a nice living in a cushy corporate job, where I could use my skills to sell soft drinks. I don’t want to do that.

Which led me to my question for Pastor Sam. If these things are my gifts, I asked him, then why isn’t it easier to get the most out of them.Shouldn’t I be able to follow the path that God has laid out, I asked, and still support my family?

First, Rodriguez reassured me that I wasn’t alone, that many people struggle with the same question. He also agreed that I was doing what God wanted me to do, and that my voice was unique and valuable — even if it did make some people feel uncomfortable at times.

Next, he said, we’ll confront, in life, open doors and closed ones, too. God leaves open the doors he wants you to go through, but closes the ones that lead you astray. You can stubbornly push on the closed doors, but they won’t open. The trick is to listen to, and trust in God — and follow your path.

Finally, Rodriguez said, looking back on his own life, he was grateful for the open doors but also for the closed ones.

It was just what I needed to hear, and I thanked him for his counsel. Then I asked him to pray for me, so that I might be a better listener, a good provider and a more faithful servant.

“I will say a special prayer for you,” he said, “so that you will know your path. God bless you.”

Thank you, Reverend. He already has — abundantly so.

 

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Pastor Samuel Rodriguez responds to First Baptist Shooting

“Here we are again broken-hearted by evil and – this time – in a sanctuary for the Prince of Peace. We pray, we cry and we plead with God for mercy on our land. We thank Him for the first responders and we trust Him to comfort those whose pain is unbearable. May our nation pray.” -Reverend Samuel Rodriguez #PrayforSutherlandSprings

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Rev. Samuel Rodriguez y NHCLC Responden a La Decisión De La DACA

Los cristianos hispanos lanzarán una campaña nacional de 60 días en apoyo a los SUEÑOS, pondrán “Presión Incesante” en los miembros del Congreso hasta que “cada Soñador pueda Soñar de Nuevo”

“No tenemos la intención de dejar que un solo miembro del Congreso tenga una buena noche de descanso hasta que garantice que nuestros jóvenes puedan descansar tranquilos”. Rev. Samuel Rodríguez

SACRAMENTO, California – Hoy, a la luz de la decisión de la Casa Blanca sobre el DACA, la Conferencia Nacional Hispana de Liderazgo Cristiano y sus iglesias y organizaciones afiliadas, anuncia una campaña nacional con la intención de poner “presión constante” en “cada” permanente, la solución legislativa se proporciona para “DREAMers”.

“Cientos de miles de jóvenes hispanos serán superados con miedo y dolor hoy. Simultáneamente, una coalición multiétnica de decenas de millones de ciudadanos respetuosos de la ley, los ciudadanos estadounidenses comenzarán a ejercer una presión incesante sobre los miembros del Congreso para que proporcionen una solución permanente a los DREAMers, cuyo destino no es su culpa ” Rev. Samuel Rodríguez, Presidente de la Conferencia Nacional Hispana de Liderazgo Cristiano. “Durante mucho tiempo en este país, los jóvenes hispanos han sido las fichas políticas de nuestros poderosos políticos. Esto es una afrenta a la santidad de la vida, es inhumana, y la comunidad hispana ya no lo soportará. Nuestros miembros electos del Congreso tienen una y otra vez, profesan preocupación por la comunidad hispana y, sin embargo, han optado por no hacer nada. No distinguiremos entre republicanos y demócratas, sino entre los que defienden la justicia y la justicia y los que no lo hacen “.

Entre otras acciones, la Conferencia Nacional Hispana de Liderazgo Cristiano estará temporalmente trasladando personal adicional a Washington, D.C., lanzando una campaña nacional de medios de comunicación, reuniendo a decenas de miles de líderes espirituales de la nación, coordinando reuniones semanales en Capitol Hill y Capitolios Estatales. Además, el NHCLC organizará un “fly-in” de cientos de prominentes líderes hispanos de toda América del Norte para una reunión de oración en la noche del 30 de octubre, seguida de una serie de visitas al Congreso el 31 de octubre.

De la decisión del Presidente Donald J. Trump de eliminar el DACA, el Rev. Samuel Rodríguez dice lo siguiente:

“Estoy decepcionado de que estas protecciones estén terminando y he expresado esa decepción a la Casa Blanca directamente. También entiendo por qué eligieron este curso de acción. Si el destino de DAPA es una indicación, entonces era sólo cuestión de tiempo antes de que DACA se enfrentara a un destino similar en los tribunales y, de hecho, todo el programa podría ser cesado inmediatamente por una orden judicial en lugar de ser eliminado. Afortunadamente, es el trabajo del Congreso de hacer leyes, y ahora el Presidente ha proporcionado al Congreso una ventana de seis meses para legislar una solución más permanente y legalmente defendible para DREAMers. Seis meses es demasiado largo, vamos a exigir la acción del Congreso dentro de 60 días. No tenemos la intención de dejar que un solo miembro del Congreso tenga una buena noche de descanso hasta que garantice que nuestros jóvenes puedan estar tranquilos. No estaremos en silencio hasta que todos los Sueños puedan soñar de nuevo. “

La Conferencia Nacional Hispana de Liderazgo Cristiano es una organización no partidista que durante mucho tiempo ha sido contada entre los principales defensores de la reforma migratoria integral de la nación. Es la posición oficial de la organización que es primordialmente la responsabilidad del Congreso de abordar los viejos desafíos de la nación con la política de inmigración. En esa capacidad, el Rev. Samuel Rodríguez ha trabajado con las mayorías demócratas y republicanas en el Congreso, así como con los presidentes George W. Bush, Barack Obama y Donald J. Trump en la promoción de la reforma migratoria integral.

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El Rev. Samuel Rodríguez es presidente de la Conferencia Nacional Hispana de Liderazgo Cristiano. Ha sido nombrado por CNN y Fox News como “el líder del movimiento hispano-evangélico” y TIME Magazine lo nombró entre los 100 líderes más influyentes en América.

La Conferencia Nacional Hispana de Liderazgo Cristiano (NHCLC) es la organización reconocida e identificada por Time Magazine, New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Christianity Today, Charisma Magazine, NBC, Telemundo, Univision, Fox News y CNN. medios de comunicación, publicaciones y publicaciones periódicas como la organización cristiana hispana / latina más grande de América con 40.118 iglesias certificadas en los Estados Unidos y en relación de pacto con ministerios e iglesias en América Latina y alrededor del mundo.

Sitio web | www.nhclc.org Twitter | @ nhclc

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Rev. Samuel Rodriguez Reacts to DACA Decision

Hispanic  Christians  to Launch  National  60-DayCampaign in  Support  of DREAMers,  Will  Put “Unrelenting  Pressure” on Members  of  Congress  Until “Every  DREAMer  can Dream Again”

“We  do  not  intend  on  letting  a  single member  of  Congress  have  a  good night’s  rest  until  they  guarantee  our young  people  can  rest  easy.” Rev. Samuel  Rodriguez

SACRAMENTO,  Calif.  —  Today, in  light  of  the White  House’s  decision on DACA,  the  National Hispanic  Christian  Leadership  Conference  and  its affiliate  churches  and  organizations, announces  a national  campaign  intent  on  putting  “unrelenting pressure”  on  “every”  member  of Congress  until  a permanent,  legislative  solution  is  provided  for “DREAMers.”

“Hundreds-of-thousands  of  Hispanic  young  people will  be  overcome  with  fear  and  grief today. Simultaneously,  a  multi-ethnic  coalition  of  tens-of-millions  of  law  abiding,  U.S.  citizens  will begin  to  put unrelenting  pressure  on  members  of  Congress  to provide  a  permanent  solution  for DREAMers, whose  fate  is  in  question  by  no  fault  of  their  own,”  said  Rev.  Samuel Rodriguez, President  of  the National Hispanic  Christian  Leadership  Conference.

“For  far  too  long  in  this country,  Hispanic  young people  have  been  the  political  bargaining  chips  of our  powerful politicians.  This  is  an  affront  to  the sanctity  of  life,  it  is  inhumane,  and  the  Hispanic community will  stand  for  it  no  longer.  Our  elected members  of  Congress  have  time  and  again, professed concern  for  the  Hispanic  community  and yet,  have  chosen  to  do  nothing.  We  will  not distinguish between  Republicans  and  Democrats but  between  those  who  stand  for  righteousness  and justice  and  those  who  do  not.”

Among  other  actions,  the  National  Hispanic. Christian  Leadership  Conference  will  be temporarily relocating  additional  staff  to  Washington,  D.C., launching  a  national  media campaign,  rallying  tens-of-thousands  of  the  nation’s  spiritual  leaders, coordinating  weekly meetings  on  Capitol  Hill  and  in State  Capitols.  Additionally,  the  NHCLC  will  be organizing  a “fly-in”  of  hundreds  of  prominent Hispanic  leaders  from  throughout  North  America  for a  prayer meeting  on  the  evening  of  Oct.  30, followed by  a  series  of  Congressional  visits  on Oct.  31.

Of  President  Donald  J.  Trump’s  decision  to  phaseout  DACA, the Rev. Samuel Rodriguez  says  the following:

“I  am  disappointed  that  these  protections  are ending  and  I’ve  expressed  that disappointment to the White House directly.  I  also  understand  why they  chose  this course  of  action.  If  the  fate  of  DACA is  any  indication,  then  it  was  only  a  matter  of  time before  DACA  would  face  a  similar  fate  in  the  court sand,  in  fact,  the  entire  program  could be  ceased immediately  by  a  court  order  rather  than  being phased  out.  Thankfully,  It  is the  job  of  Congress  to make  laws,  and  now  the  President  has provided Congress  a  six month  window  to  legislate  a  more permanent  and  legally  defensible  solution  for DREAMers.  Six  months  is  too  long,  we  will  demand action  from  Congress  within  60 days.  We  do  not intend  on  letting  a  single  member  of  Congress  have a  good  night’s  rest until  they  guarantee  our  young people  can  rest  easy.  We  will  not  be  silent  until every DREAMer  can  dream  again.”

The  National  Hispanic  Christian  Leadership Conference  is  a  non-partisan  organization  that  has long  been  numbered  among  the  nation’s  foremost advocates  for  comprehensive  immigration reform.  It is  the  organization’s  official  position  that  it  is primarily  the  responsibility  of  Congress  to address the  nation’s  longstanding  challenges  with immigration  policy.  In  that  capacity  Rev. Samuel Rodriguez  has  worked  with  Democrat  and Republican  majorities  in  Congress  as  well  as with Presidents  George  W.  Bush,  Barack  Obama  and Donald  J.  Trump  in  advocating  for comprehensive immigration  reform.

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Rev. Samuel  Rodriguez  is  president  of  the  National Hispanic  Christian  Leadership  Conference. He  has been named  by  CNN  and  Fox  News  as  “the  leader  of  the Hispanic  Evangelical  movement”  and  TIME Magazine nominated  him  among  the  100  most  influential  leaders  in America.

The  National  Hispanic  Christian  Leadership  Conference( NHCLC)  is  the  organization  recognized  and identified  by Time  Magazine,  New  York  Times,  The  Wall  Street  Journal, Christianity  Today,  Charisma Magazine,  NBC,  Telemundo, Univision,  Fox  News,  CNN,  and  a  number  of  additional media  outlets, publications,  and  periodicals  as  America’s largest  Hispanic/Latino  Christian  organization  with  40,118 certified  member  churches  in  the  United  States  and  in covenant  relationship  with  ministries  and  churches in  LatinAmerica  and  around  the  world.

 

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