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2016 Election

Trump And The Evangelicals: Will He Drop Them Now He's Won?

White evangelicals, at least, voted in massive numbers for Donald Trump. Many of them were genuine churchgoers, though it's not always appreciated that 'evangelical' in the US is a social identifier like 'Church of England' used to be in the UK; it doesn't mean they go to church or even believe in God. Evangelicals have had reason to wonder, though, whether they were just being used for their votes by someone who had every reason to tell them what they wanted to hear. Trump has already...



How Hispanics helped put Trump in the White House

The Hispanic vote played a decisive role in the presidential election, just not in the way most people expected. At first, every major network assumed that the Democrats’ “blue wall,” reinforced by a surging Hispanic electorate, would prove too much for the Trump/Pence ticket to overcome. After all, there were 4 million more Hispanic voters in 2016 than there were in 2012. Early exit poll data suggested only 19 percent of Hispanics were voting for Trump. But as the night went on,...



‘Sanctuary churches’ vow to shield immigrants from Trump crackdown

First came the mayors of New York, Chicago and Seattle declaring their cities “sanctuaries” and saying they will protect undocumented immigrants from President-elect Donald Trump’s plan to deport them. Then thousands of students, professors, alumni and others at elite universities including Harvard, Yale and Brown signed petitions asking their schools to protect undocumented students from any executive order. Now, religious congregations, including churches and synagogues, are...



Can evangelicals unite after the 2016 election?

The day after the election, Lisa Sharon Harper nearly gave up the title "evangelical." That's because 81 percent of white evangelical Christians voted for Donald Trump for president, a candidate she described as "representing all of the things Jesus stood against—lust for money, sex and power." And their vote propelled the Republican nominee to victory. "I felt betrayed. I felt like that's just not who I am anymore. This group who voted for Trump is just not who I am," said Harper,...



Leaders react to Trump win in presidential election

In Atlanta Archbishop Wilton D. Gregory’s statement WASHINGTON (CNS)—Lay and religious leaders of all stripes reacted to news of Donald J. Trump’s upset win in the Nov. 8 presidential election. Most expressed hope that Trump would pay attention to their agenda, while others were more decidedly downbeat and still others counseled prayer. Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz of Louisville, Kentucky, president of the U.S. bishops’ conference, outlined an ambitious agenda in a Nov....



How Do We Parent Our Kids During This Political Season?

More than a week ago, Donald J. Trump was elected president. Parents of all political stripes—Republicans, Democrats, and independents—are faced with the same question: How do we talk with our kids about the results of this particular election? We asked 20 mothers to respond to one or more of the following questions: As a parent, how are you thinking about the election of Donald J. Trump? What specific comments or concerns are you hearing from your kids, and how are you...



Can evangelicals unite after the 2016 election?

The day after the election, Lisa Sharon Harper nearly gave up the name “evangelical.” That’s because 81 percent of white evangelical Christians voted for Donald Trump for president, a candidate she described as “representing all of the things Jesus stood against — lust for money, sex and power.” And their vote propelled the Republican nominee to victory. “I felt betrayed. I felt like that’s just not who I am anymore. This group who voted for Trump is just not who I...



Immigration activists retool their push for reform, reach out to Trump and GOP

A new roster of moderate and conservative Latino groups could have a seat at President-elect Donald Trump’s immigration policy table. Trump, who campaigned on taking a strong stance against illegal immigration, and did better with Latino voters than expected – getting 29 percent of their vote, and more than 35 percent in some regions -- could find common ground on the issue with groups like the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and even conservative leaders who did not endorse him and...



RELIGIOUS LEADERS REACT TO TRUMP'S SHOCK US PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION WIN

Lay and religious leaders of all stripes reacted to news of Donald J. Trump's shock win in the presidential election. Most expressed hope that Trump would pay attention to their agenda, while others were more decidedly downbeat and still others counselled prayer. Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz of Louisville, Kentucky, president of the U.S. bishops' conference, outlined an ambitious agenda in a Nov. 9 post election statement that congratulated Trump and all election victors. "The bishops'...



The Evangelical Reckoning Over Donald Trump

For months, the stories came in waves. The death of the religious right. The new moral minority. The Christian case for voting Trump, followed by the Christian case for not voting Trump. Everyone wanted to know what conservative evangelicals, who have long been considered a unified voting bloc, would do during this election. Now, it is clear. They overwhelmingly supported Donald Trump. The Republican candidate’s victory may seem like an affirmation of the old, long-standing...



Religious, lay leaders react to Trump win in presidential election

WASHINGTON (CNS) — Lay and religious leaders of all stripes reacted to news of Donald J. Trump’s upset win in the Nov. 8 presidential election. Most expressed hope that Trump would pay attention to their agenda, while others were more decidedly downbeat and still others counseled prayer. Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz of Louisville, Kentucky, president of the U.S. bishops’ conference, outlined an ambitious agenda in a Nov. 9 postelection statement that congratulated Trump and all...



Religious Leaders React to Trump’s Victory

The world’s religious leaders have mixed reactions to a Trump presidency. In the year and half or so that political campaigns for the recent presidential elections commenced, the American public was brought through a mental and emotional roller coaster. The range of experience throughout the elections included the exchange of heated, and sometimes downright nasty words, repartee that turned from civil to deeply unpleasant, and the discovery of sordid details about the candidates,...