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Clinton Closes in on the Magic Number

Clinton Closes in on the Magic Number

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OFF TO THE RACES: Clinton is now 92 delegates away from hitting magic number

Hillary Clinton is within 100 delegates of the nomination after being projected the apparent winner of the Kentucky primary.

Sanders won in Oregon, but he needed Kentucky too in the face of criticism that he's hurting party unification by staying in the race, Alex Seitz-Wald writes.

From the New York Times: "The close result meant that she and Mr. Sanders would effectively split the state's delegates. Nonetheless, winning Kentucky would give her a symbolic triumph that could blunt the effect of her loss in Oregon as she turns her attention to Donald J. Trump, her likely general election opponent."

A new WBUR poll shows it would be a tight contest between Trump and Clinton in New Hampshire.

The AP: "Donald Trump is rushing to install operatives in several states that traditionally favor Democrats, pointing to a general election plan consistent with the campaign he has run thus far: Defying conventional wisdom and political trends. The staffing expansion includes Maine, Minnesota and other places where Trump opens as the underdog, with the New York billionaire seeking to expand the electoral battlefield by drawing on his appeal among working class white voters — and probable Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton's perceived weakness with them. Still, it is an unlikely path to the White House, through states that no Republican presidential candidate has carried since the 1980s."

CLINTON: She earned more than $5 million in book royalties and about $1.5 million for paid speeches last year, according a financial disclosure released by her campaign.

In case you were wondering: No, Bill Clinton can't serve in Hillary Clinton's cabinet.

The Clinton campaign is still trying to figure out the best way to attack Trump,POLITICO reports.

Tim Kaine is at the top of the list when it comes to speculation about Clinton's vice president, but some Democrats worry he wouldn't be an aggressive attack dog.

"Interviews in a civil lawsuit with current and former State Department officials concerning former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server will begin this week," writes the Wall Street Journal.

TRUMP: From NBC's Kelly O'Donnell, Hallie Jackson and Alex Jaffe: "Donald Trump and the Republican National Committee have finalized an agreement that will allow individual donors to contribute nearly half a million dollars each toward electing the presumptive nominee and other down-ballot Republicans this fall."

He buried the hatchet with Megyn Kelly. Reach Ali Vitali's dispatch on the big interview here.

Trump says he would talk directly with Kim Jong Un about nuclear weapons.

Dante Chinni lays out why Trump must make gains among female voters to win the White House.

Trump's plan to fix his image is to explain past controversies, like the accusation that he mocked a disabled reporter, the Washington Post reports.

He called his financial disclosure the "largest in the history of the FEC." It has not yet been made public.

Melania Trump told a magazine interviewer that her husband is "not Hitler."

The New York Times Magazine has a long story on how Trump became the last man standing.

The Washington Post delves into Trump's relationship with a Russian man linked to the Mafia.

He'll address the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference by pre-taped video remarks, Bloomberg reports.

Trump is preparing for a convention in Cleveland that pushes traditions out the door.

SANDERS: He was defiant Tuesday in the face of criticism for the behavior of his supporters at the Nevada Democratic convention.

More, from the New York Times: "Mr. Sanders's supporters showed no sign of backing down on Tuesday. In interviews, several threatened to disrupt the party's convention in Philadelphia in July with protests and nonviolent disobedience over a nominating system that they say has treated Mr. Sanders unfairly. In emails, on social media and on websites, his supporters have traded advice about protest tactics and legal services in case of mass arrests."

Dana Milbank compares Bernie Sanders to Ralph Nader.

OBAMA AGENDA: New overtime rules

The Department of Labor issued new overtime rules. From the AP: "The regulations being issued by the Labor Department Wednesday would double to $913 a week from $455 the threshold under which salaried workers must be paid overtime. In terms of annual pay, the threshold rises to $47,476 from $23,660. The rules take effect Dec. 1."

More on the move, from the New York Times: "Once the rule goes into effect on Dec. 1, many workers will receive more pay when they work overtime, but others may end up working fewer hours if employers move to limit their time at work. In other cases, employers may decide to increase the salaries of some workers to push them over the cutoff so that the employers will not have to pay overtime or hire additional workers after limiting hours for existing employees."

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