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Daylight can be seen for a Trump v Hispanic political resolution

Daylight can be seen for a Trump v Hispanic political resolution

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Hillary Clinton’s worst nightmare, aside from the possibility of an FBI recommendation for a criminal indictment, is prominent Hispanic conservatives saying they could back Donald Trump. In the ever-changing political landscape of election 2016, it’s a distinct reality if he gently walks back some of his controversial policy positions.

Naturally, the main position Hispanics despise is Trump’s pledge to build a southern border wall with Mexico paying for it. It didn’t help that he included the comments about rapists and criminals coming across the border, even though it’s true. As of Saturday, there is hope of a change in attitude for both sides.

Trump trailed Clinton by 39 points among Hispanic voters in a Fox News Latino poll released on Friday. Prominent voices in the conservative Hispanic world publicly proclaim there could be a truce of sorts between the two sides.

At least that is what Alfonso Aguilar, a former White House official under President George W. Bush who now leads the Latino Partnership for Conservative Principles, says. He’s ready to open a conversation with Trump. Aguilar has been quite critical of Trump in the past.

However, over the weekend Trump sent a video to this weekend’s National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference (NHCLC). Trump's video aired Friday night, along with one from Clinton. Trump stressed a process for unification. It’s obvious ‘The Donald” is seeking to change his image with Hispanics.

Trump has also spoken with former Sen. Mel Martinez (Fla.), a former Republican National Committee chairman. He has yet to endorse Trump and “will be continuing to see how things develop.” Like Aguilar, Martinez’s comments are a far cry from 2015 statements where both men said they would never support the flamboyant New Yorker.

Trump can’t afford the risk of doing worse than 2012 GOP nominee Mitt Romney, who won only 27 percent of the Hispanic vote. Hillary faces no cakewalk with Hispanics. In fact, 41 percent of Hispanics have a negative view of the former secretary of state. It suggests some vulnerability.

It will be a difficult task for Trump to balance the line of possible Hispanic support with his base who believes immigrants strongly weaken the country, according to a recent Wall Street Journal poll. But being the successful businessman he is, his reply is “everything is negotiable.”

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